Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Investigative reporting" ...

  • Reveal: Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • "The Costs of the Confederacy" / "Monumental Lies"

    Reporters Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler, along with a team of Type Investigations researchers, spent more than a year investigating public funding for sites—monuments, statues, parks, libraries, museums—and Confederate “heritage” organizations that promote an inaccurate “Lost Cause” version of American history. According to scholars, that ideology distorts the nation’s collective past by venerating Confederate leaders and the common Confederate soldier; framing of the Civil War as a struggle for Southern states’ rights against “northern aggression”; denying Southern culpability and slavery itself for any role in precipitating the war; and presenting chattel slavery as a humane, Christianizing institution. This is more than mere Confederate myth-making, it is a century-and-half old strategy that was historically deployed to terrorize and disenfranchise African American citizens and to reinstall white supremacy across the South in the wake of Reconstruction. The historic sites that perpetuate these myths have been central to racial violence in recent years, from the Dylann Roof shooting at the AME Zion Church — he had visited Confederate sites before his attack — to the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, centered around the defense of a Confederate monument.
  • Caregivers and Takers

    “Caregivers and Takers,” a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, uncovered rampant exploitation of caregivers at senior board-and-care homes across the United States. Many are poor immigrants who earn about $2 an hour to work around the clock with no days off while operators rake in millions. Some owners charge workers "room and board" for sleeping on a couch or in a garage. Caregivers are routinely harassed and fired if they complain. Some feared for their lives. Prosecutors liken these workplace conditions to indentured servitude. Many of these caregivers are immigrants, and evidence indicates that some were trafficked.
  • Silicon Valley’s Hidden Figures

    Silicon Valley has a big diversity problem. But no one has been able to comprehensively quantify it until now. Some of the multibillion-dollar companies that fuel the global economy have sought to hide how few women and people of color they have in their organizations, refusing to release the data, claiming the information is a trade secret. We built the largest and most comprehensive database of diversity employment data for Silicon Valley available. Through a groundbreaking collaboration with a University of Massachusetts Amherst sociologist, we got Equal Employment Opportunity Council (EEOC) data for 177 of the largest tech companies through public records requests and a successful FOIA lawsuit. Through this data, we uncovered disparities and ranked companies based on their diversity scores. By establishing a baseline of comparative data, we were able to hold companies accountable for their diversity hiring practices for the first time. Because of our analysis, the public now knows some of the worst companies when it comes to diversity in Silicon Valley. But we also found that diversity is not an impossible goal to achieve for technology companies: some are doing much better than their peers.
  • Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism: Undemocratic

    An investigative reporting class at the University of Wisconsin-Madison investigated the state of Wisconsin's democracy. It found that partisan gerrymandering, voter restrictions, secret campaign money, furtive legislative moves and fast-tracking of bills increasingly leave Wisconsin's citizens in the dark when it comes to state policy making and spending.
  • The Texas Tribune: Families Divided

    Thanks to unrelenting investigative reporting from a scrappy but devoted team of Texas Tribune journalists, the stories of migrant children separated from their parents at the border have fully come to light — and revealed the profound human toll of a sudden policy shift from Washington that reverberated around the world.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: Tax Breaks: The Favored Few

    In February 2018, Congress passed a massive budget bill, and President Donald Trump signed it. It provided new money for the military. It funded disaster relief efforts. And it raised the nation’s “debt ceiling” — allowing the government to secure new loans. While these provisions grabbed headlines amid the chaos of what was, at best, a slapdash scramble to pass a budget and avert another government shutdown, a gaggle of goodies, benefiting a bevy of special interests, slipped into the bill’s 652 pages almost unnoticed. These goodies are called “tax extenders.” Seeing an opportunity to boldly tell an effectively untold tale, the staff of the Center for Public Integrity endeavored to explain how every tax extender — more than 30 in all — came to fruition and reveal how lobbyists gamed the political system and squeezed $16 billion worth of special favors from it. This project represented a rare example of deep investigative reporting on Congress. While hundred of reporters cover what Mitch MCConnell and Nancy Pelosi said yesterday, very few unravel how the institution of Congress is corrupted.
  • Texas Tribune: Families Divided

    Thanks to unrelenting investigative reporting from a scrappy but devoted team of Texas Tribune journalists, the stories of migrant children separated from their parents at the border have fully come to light — and revealed the profound human toll of a sudden policy shift from Washington that reverberated around the world.
  • Smithsonian Magazine and Reveal, in partnership with The Investigative Fund: The Costs of the Confederacy

    Defenders of Confederate memorials often speak of them as history to be preserved. But a project from Smithsonian Magazine and Reveal, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, found that many of these monuments, created by Jim Crow governments, receive substantial taxpayer support in the present. Lead reporters Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler found at least $40 million in public monies over the past decade directed to Confederate sites and organizations that embrace white-supremacist ideologies and suppress or whitewash slavery.