Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Justin Fenton" ...

  • Cops and Robbers

    This series charts the path of perhaps the most corrupt officer to wear a Baltimore Police badge, from his history of ignored complaints of abuse and untruthfulness to showing the depths of crimes uncovered by a federal investigation, including drug trafficking and robbery. The story maps out how the corruption was not an isolated event confined to a particular unit, but rather ingrained in the culture of “plainclothes” police units long relied on to combat crime. It exposes new allegations, and educates readers who might otherwise not understand the negative effects of aggressive policing employed in Baltimore’s most high-crime neighborhoods.
  • Baltimore Sun: The Baltimore Police Gun Trace Task Force Scandal

    The Baltimore Sun’s coverage of arguably the biggest corruption scandal in the history of the Baltimore Police Department continued into 2018, with the trials of the remaining officers charged in the federal case and the fallout from the case. The Sun produced work that revealed the suburban drug case that led authorities to the rogue squad, how the convictions thrust into question thousands of open and adjudicated cases involving the officers and what the trials revealed about the deep reach of the city’s drug economy.
  • The death of Korryn Gaines

    These stories explored the death of Korryn Gaines after a six-hour standoff with Baltimore County police. Baltimore Sun reporters were able to shed light on the incident with stories about Gaines’ past encounters with police and social media postings, an exclusive interview with the neighbor who allowed police to drill holes in the wall he shared with Gaines’ apartment so they could monitor her movements, and another exclusive on court documents showing that police sought Gaines’ private Facebook messages and other account information. Reporters also explored other angles, such as the role social media is playing in encounters with police across the country. Finally, reporters gained exclusive access to the investigative file that provided a trove of information on how the standoff went down.
  • Shoot to Kill

    With no dependable, uniform data on gun violence, it’s impossible to get even a simple tally of the number of shootings in the United States. So Baltimore Sun reporter George and Marquette University students, as part of the O’Brien Fellowship in Public Service Journalism, spent months trying to understand how many people are shot and how often they survive. What they found is that the odds of survival for gunshot victims were getting worse in at least 10 of the nation’s largest cities, including Baltimore, New York and Chicago.
  • The death of Freddie Gray

    The April death of a West Baltimore man in police custody quickly spiraled into a controversy that left some city neighborhoods in flames, and brought attention from national and international media. Within days, the name Freddie Gray became associated with the broader debate over the way police across the nation treated African-Americans. Central to that debate was a singular question: How did Gray die? The Baltimore Sun set out to provide an answer by investigating allegations of police brutality and dissecting the crucial minutes after Gray was arrested. Reporters revealed that Gray was not the first person to be seriously injured in a police transport van, and that officers routinely ignored calls by detainees for medical care. http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/police-convictions/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/intake-logs/rejections/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/freddie-gray/
  • City Rape Statistics Questioned

    The Sun's investigation found that nearly a third of rapes reported in the city were being deemed "untrue or baseless" by detectives. The paper uncovered examples of women being grilled by detectives until they recanted their stories; and in many case reports never made it from street patrol cops to the detectives.
  • A Trail of Deception

    Cindy McKay was a thief "who pilfered hundreds of thousands of dollars from small businesses, from a Catholic seminary, from a charity, from the aged, from lovers, from many who trusted her." Fenton in this three part series takes a close look at her past and how she was finally caught.