Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Manhattan District Attorney" ...

  • Chris Christie, White House Ambitions and the Abuse of Power

    Chris Christie, White House Ambitions and the Abuse of Power is a series of reports on the exercise of power by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and his administration. The stories investigate his administration’s use of the busiest bridge in the world to take political revenge on a small-town mayor; the operation of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for the political and financial benefit of his administration and his friends and donors; and the use of federal Sandy aid to strong arm the mayor of Hoboken. These reports focused national attention on a leading Republican candidate in the 2016 presidential race. Plus, they established the narrative both for national and local coverage and for state and federal investigations of the administration. Most important, WNYC uncovered key information about the politicization of public entities by an elected official whose appeal to voters is based on the perception that he is above politics. Our submission for review by the IRE includes our most significant work on this story. Our reporting resulted in the forced resignation of Gov. Christie’s top man at the Port Authority, a bi-state agency that controls $8 billion in annual revenue raised largely from tolls and fares paid by commuters of this region. In addition, WNYC’s in-depth reports on the Port Authority prompted criminal investigations by the Manhattan District Attorney and the Securities and Exchange Commission into the misuse of Port Authority funds. It led the United States Attorney for New Jersey to widen its investigation into conflicts of interest by David Samson, the Port Authority Chair, and a close Christie ally. And the reporting has spurred the creation of a bi-state panel to reform the Port Authority, as well as reform measures in the New Jersey and New York Legislatures.
  • "Conviction", Dateline NBC

    This is a 10-year hidden camera investigation into a likely case of a wrongful conviction in New York City. Ultimately, our broadcast triggered the Manhattan District Attorney’s office to officially reopen and reinvestigate the case as part of its newly created “Conviction Integrity Unit.” Our investigation may also have led to the identity of the real murder suspect.
  • Conviction

    This is a 10-year hidden camera investigation into a likely case of a wrongful conviction in New York City. Ultimately, our broadcast triggered the Manhattan District Attorney’s office to officially reopen and reinvestigate the case as part of its newly created “Conviction Integrity Unit.” Our investigation may also have led to the identity of the real murder suspect. It was reported by Luke Russert.
  • The Clarks: An American Story

    The Huguette Clark story began as a feature, a tale of mystery. Investigative reporter Bill Dedman began with a simple question: Why are the mansions of one of America's richest women sitting vacant? The result morphed into a breaking story, spawning criminal investigation by the Manhattan district attorney and most recently the U.S. attorney's office.
  • "Iran's Manhattan Project"

    This investigative report reveals how Iran has "been able to launder billions" of dollars, with assistance from New York banks, to improve their nuclear weapons program. The U.S. has relied on "unenforceable sanctions" that have allowed Iran to easily bypass the measures in place. After their permission to film was "revoked," the investigative team posed as tourists to get the rest of the story.
  • I Didn't Do That Murder; New Light On Old Case

    Based on questions reporter Christine Young raised in her reporting of a 1987 murder conviction, the Manhattan District Attorney's Office, in a rare decision, is re-investigating the murder case of Michaelanne Hall, a prostitute brutally murdered in 1989. The man convicted for the crime, Lebrew Jones, was a mentally retarded security guard and his conviction rested on a nonsensical statement he gave to police. Now 51, Jones is awaiting DNA test results from the fingernail clippings of the murder victim. Also, a potentially viable suspect has emerged as a result of Young's work.
  • The Newspaper Racket

    Robbins profiles Doug LaChance, a former newspaper drivers union president and alleged mob associate. LaChance, who has a lifetime contract to deliver the New York Times that pays him about $200,000 a year, has been imprisoned twice and has also been the subject of an eight-year-old racketeering case brought by a Manhattan district attorney. Despite stepping down as president of the Newspaper and Mail Deliverers Union in 1993, many members still consider him the union's major power. And law enforcement officials believe that LaChance wields his influence on behalf of the Luchese crime family. Robbins explains that thugs like LaChance are descendents of gangsters hired by newspapers in the early 20th century to help them gain market share -- by any means necessary.
  • Stadium Naples

    This IRE story is actually the FOI requests, court filings, affidavits and correspondence relating to reporter Gina Edwards attempts to obtain court-related documents from the state of New York "involving A.S. Goldman, a Naples-based brokerage firm that has been implicated in a $100 million fraud. ... New York's committee on Open Government, an official state body, agrees that the documents constitute public records, yet Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau's office has refused our repeated FOIL requests to review discovery documents." The story corresponding with the documents is #17443.
  • (Untitled)

    Vanity Fair Magazine looks at the investigation of Clark Clifford, a pillar in the Democratic Party, and his relationship with the BCCI banking scandal; profiles Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau, who is leading the investigation, April 1992.
  • (Untitled)

    Newsday (Long Island, N.Y.) reports on a real estate and savings and loan tycoon who conned $150 million from more than 2,200 investors, including celebrities; case is described as the biggest white-collar crime in the history of the Manhattan district attorney's office; man and 12 associates are convicted on fraud and larceny-related charges, Oct. 7, 1990.