Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Medical reporting" ...

  • "America's Weed Rush"

    “America's Weed Rush” is an investigation of marijuana legalization in America, is the 2015 project of the Carnegie-Knight News21 program, a national multimedia investigative reporting project produced by the nation’s top journalism students and graduates. http://weedrush.news21.com
  • Bad Medicine Behind Bars

    The death of inmate Mario Martinez in Alameda County’s jail led 2 Investigates to uncover a web of medical negligence, gaps in oversight, and cozy connections to public officials accepting money. We analyzed hundreds of pages of medical records, coroner’s reports, and court documents, which showed that despite multiple court orders the jail’s medical provider, Corizon Healthcare, repeatedly denied surgery to Martinez before his death.
  • Deadly Dentistry

    Government failures allow dentists to endanger and even kill their patients. A death occurs about once every other day in America, but regulators rarely take public action. They often keep important safety information secret. Even when discipline is meted out, dentists often go right on treating patients. And the criminal justice system offers victims little hope.
  • Dangerous Device

    NBC Nightly News’ “Dangerous Device” reports are the product of a yearlong investigation into surgically implanted medical devices that our research linked to at least 39 deaths and hundreds of injuries. Our investigation, which prompted a U.S. Senate inquiry, uncovered a forgery submitted to the federal government, and revealed that the device’s maker knew early on that its product -- and the model that replaced it -- had potentially fatal flaws. Still, the company decided not to recall these devices from the market. [P1: http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/medical-device-to-prevent-blood-clots-associated-with-27-fatalities-518273603659] [P2: http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/did-manufacturer-of-medical-device-linked-to-27-deaths-ignore-safety-concerns--519077443933] [P3: http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/re-designed-heart-medical-device-linked-to-at-least-a-dozen-deaths-594261059962]
  • How Urgent Is ‘Urgent’ Healthcare? As walk-in urgent care centers spread, so do questions about their expertise. One thing for sure: They’re not emergency rooms.

    More and more medical practices across the country are rebranding themselves as urgent care centers. Their proliferation is skyrocketing, almost unheard of two decades ago. They sound like places promising the kind of medical attention offered at emergency rooms. But they don’t. They are unregulated in New York and most other states; in New York, they are combating any effort at more oversight. For patients who go expecting emergency room-like care, there are concerns. There can result is delay in needed care, lack of equipment to do vital tests, and even fatal results. There is also a dark economic underbelly harming hospitals that actually do emergency work.
  • Hidden Errors

    An investigation into serious flaws in the nation's system for regulating common medical tests -- ones that harm patients and then hide the results from the public. http://www.jsonline.com/watchdog/watchdogreports/hidden-errors-360092411.html
  • Arizona's Dental Dangers

    Our unprecedented investigation into Arizona's dental industry exposed how patients have been repeatedly victimized by bad dentists and the unjust system that protects them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpdE4rcY4QM&feature=youtu.be http://www.abc15.com/dentaldangers
  • Unapproved Drugs

    The government is paying millions for risky medications that have never been reviewed for safety and effectiveness but are still covered under Medicaid, an Associated Press analysis of federal data has found. Tax payers have shelled out at least $200 million since 2004 for such drugs. Yet the Food and Drug Administration says unapproved prescription drugs are a public health problem, and some unapproved medications have been dozens of deaths. Millions of private patients are taking them as well, and their availability may create a false sense of security. The AP analysis found that Medicaid, which serves low-income people, paid nearly $198 million from 2004 to 2007 for more than 100 unapproved drugs. Data for 2008 were not available but unapproved drugs still are being sold. The AP checked the medications against FDA databases, using agency guidelines to determine if they were unapproved. The FDA says there may be thousands of such drugs on the market. The medications are mainly for common conditions like colds ad pain. They date back decades, before the FDA tightened its review of its review of drugs in the early 1960s. The FDA says it is trying to squeeze them from the market, but conflicting federal laws allow the Medicaid health program for low-income people to pay for them.
  • Right Place, Right Time -- Ohio's fledging trauma system saving lives

    This investigation examines Ohio's 2-year old trauma law. It found that in general the law is effective, the state has more trauma centers than any other and patients are often directed to the ones best suited for their needs. The investigation also found that the law still has a way to go, and that medical helicopters are benefiting from the changes.
  • Cancer Machine

    KTVB-TV finds "a local company diagnoses people with severe illnesses from a fax of their blood and saliva and then claims that a 'Sound Wave Machine' they manufacture will cure the patient's illness. We found that it is legal for them to manufacture and treat people with their machine, but it is not legal to diagnose people without a valid medical license (which they do not have)."