Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "NIH" ...

  • Citizen 865: The Hunt for Hitler’s Hidden Soldiers in America

    Through insider accounts, Justice Department documents and research in four countries, Citizen 865 chronicles the setbacks, failures and great successes of a small team of federal prosecutors and historians that spent decades working to expose a brutal group of Nazi war criminals living in the United States. In 1990, in a basement archive in Prague, two American historians made a startling discovery: a Nazi roster from 1945 that no Western investigator had ever seen. The long-forgotten document, containing more than 700 names, helped unravel the details behind the most lethal killing operation in World War Two. In the tiny Polish village of Trawniki, the SS set up a school for mass murder and then recruited a roving army of foot soldiers, 5,000 men strong, to help annihilate the Jewish population of occupied Poland. More than 1.7 million Jews were murdered in fewer than 20 months, the span of two Polish summers. After the war, some of these men vanished, making their way to the U.S. and blending into communities across America. Though they participated in some of the most unspeakable crimes of the Holocaust, “Trawniki Men” spent years hiding in plain sight, their secrets intact. In a story spanning seven decades, Citizen 865 details the wartime journeys of two Jewish orphans from occupied Poland who outran the men of Trawniki and settled in the United States, only to learn that some of their one-time captors had followed. A team of prosecutors and historians pursued these men and, up against the forces of time and political opposition, battled to the present day to remove them from U.S. soil.
  • Democracy Now! Special: Four Days in Occupied Western Sahara—A Rare Look Inside Africa’s Last Colony

    Democracy Now! breaks a multiyear media blockade on occupied Western Sahara imposed by the Kingdom of Morocco, documenting the brutality of an occupation inside Africa’s last colony.
  • Pharma’s Windfall: The Mining of Rare Diseases

    In 1983, California congressman Henry Waxman helped pass the Orphan Drug Act to encourage research on rare diseases. The law offered financial incentives to drug makers in hopes they would tackle long-neglected disorders while breaking even or posting modest profits. Ever since, the Orphan Drug Act was lauded as government at its finest, praised for providing a boon in generating new pharmaceuticals. But by the act’s 30th anniversary, The Seattle Times found that the law’s good intentions had been subverted. In what amounts to a windfall, the pharmaceutical industry has exploited this once-obscure niche of the healthcare field, turning rare diseases into a multibillion dollar enterprise and the fastest-growing sector of America’s prescription-drug system. The series, “Pharma’s Windfall: The Mining of Rare Diseases,” uses extensive data from the FDA and NIH, along with financial reports from the SEC to show the financial incentives behind the system. For the human repercussions, the reporters found and told the stories of families struggling with rare disease.
  • The Deadly Dust

    Fox Five found that in the 1990s the National Institutes of Health was not having employees wear the required safety gear, exposing them to asbestos. Using a hidden camera, they were able to confirm that even now employees were still being exposed.
  • Suddenly Sick

    In this series, The Seattle Times revealed their findings from an investigation into the medical world. Among other things, they found that: "Pharmaceutical firms have commandeered the process by which diseases are defined." They reported that the World Health Organization and the U.S. Institutes of Health, among others, receive money from drug companies to promote the agendas of those companies. They also found that "some diseases have been radically redefined without a strong basis in medical evidence."
  • The National Institutes of Health: Public Servant or Private Marketer?

    This series examines how payments from drug companies to scientists at the National Institutes of Health cause a conflict of interest that affects health care and policy recommendations. Even under the partial reforms announced by the presidentially appointed NIH director in 2004, some NIH scientists would still be able to take compensation such as stock options and consulting fees.
  • Stealth Merger: Drug Companies and Government Medical Research

    This investigation is about how the National Institute of Health allows its scientists to take side jobs as consultants for drug companies. The articles show how this conflict of interest can affect their work, and how it can be detrimental to the health of America. Not only does the agency allow for the conflict of interest, but it allows top-paid employees to keep their consulting confidential.
  • How a cancer trial ended in betrayal

    The Baltimore Sun's three-part series on BCX-34, an experimental cancer drug. It finds that "with billions at stake, research universities become partners in commerce--and medicine pays a price."
  • The Body Hunters

    A Washington Post investigation into corporate drug experiments in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America reveals a booming, poorly regulated testing system that is dominated by private interests and that far too often betrays its promises to patients and consumers.
  • A People in Peril: Pimas on the front lines of an epidemic

    The Arizona Republic reports a "three-day series examined the epidemic of diabetes in the Gila River Indian Community south of Phoenix and how the effects of the disease had become substantially worse despite more than three decades of research into the problem..."