Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "National Archives" ...

  • Meeting L.A. Koreans in the year 1940

    The U.S. National Archives (NARA) homepage had a flood of connections last April 2nd. That was because the personal data of 132 million who participated in the 1940 Census became public. The national household Census, which is held every 10 years, first only announce statistics. Names as well as detailed personal information becomes public only after 72 years due to the laws protecting individual identities. The 1940 Census unsealed this year also contain details of groups of Koreans at the time. Our paper probed each and every page of the L.A. City Census running 400,000 pages for 3 months and found 415 Koreans who lived in L.A. at that time. Wholly compiled data of personal information ranging 34 types including individual names and occupations were put into a database. Among all press organizations, this was the first time that only Koreans were extracted from the Census for analysis.
  • The War Behind Me: Vietnam Veterans Confront the Truth about War Crimes

    "'The War Behind Me' describes our search for answers, not only from the archive but also from the men named in it. We tracked down veterans accused of committing atrocities, witnesses who reported them, and higher-ups who covered them up."
  • The War Behind Me: Vietnam Veterans Confront the Truth about War Crimes

    This book was born out of an archive of war-crime reports from the Vietnam war. Declassified in 1990, they shed light on the extent of such atrocities during the Vietnam conflict. "The War Behind Me describes our search for answers, not only from the archive but also from the men named in it. We tracked down veterans accused of committing atrocities, witnesses who reported them, and higher-ups who covered them up."
  • Mayaguez

    CBS News investigates what happened to three American troops left behind alive on Koh Tang Island in the last battle of America's war in Southeast Asia. The mission of the Marines who fought the battle was to save the crew of the SS Mayaguez, a merchant ship seized by the Cambodians. "For decades the mission was hailed as a victory. In truth, it was a military disaster in which bad intelligence cost American lives," the segment reveals. Other findings include that the government knew the three Marines left behind were alive; that the men could have been saved for days, possibly weeks, before being captured and executed; and that their families were told that the troops died in combat.
  • Who Owns the Lubomirski Durers?

    ARTworks follows through the centuries the path of Lubomirski Durers, a group of great drawings worth millions of dollars. The paintings were placed in a Polish museum in 1823 by Prince Henryk Lubomirski, later seized by the Soviets, exposed in a Ukrainian library, and finally looted by the Nazis. The art pieces were discovered by U.S. troops and secretly turned over to the grandson of Prince Lubomirski by order of the State department, the story reveals. Now both the Polish museum and the Ukrainian library demand the return, but American high-level diplomats and ten museums in the U.S.A. Canada and Europe have made a decision to reject the claims. "Experts say [this] is the most complicated of all war-loot restitution cases," the magazine reports.
  • Search for Justice

    ABC News 20/20 reports "an investigation of one of Germany's largest pharmaceutical companies Bayer and its role in human medical experimentation on concentration camp inmates during World War II. .... documented for the first time the depth and scope of Bayer's involvement in human medical experiments in concentration camps. The research protocol in (one) case involved infecting healthy children with life-threatening diseases like typhus and then using experimental Bayer vaccines to see if they could combat the disease...."
  • Nazi Loot in American Museums

    ABC News set out to unravel the mystery of how tens of thousands of precious artworks stolen during World War II by the Nazis from Jewish families disappeared from Hitler's secret stash in Paris only to resurface decades later in prominent museums and galleries around the world. The story asked whether American museums and art dealers had been willing to overlook the sometimes clouded history of the art they acquired. Had they unknowingly - or knowingly - collaborated with the Nazis by keeping valuable art from its rightful owners?
  • America's Top-Secret Spy War

    U.S. News & World Report conducts a six month investigation using 10,000 classified records which had been sealed away at the National Archives for nearly 30 years. The records and more than 150 follow-up interviews reveal an aggressive U.S. espionage campaign whose full scope has never before been disclosed.
  • Roundup

    In a three-month investigation that began in the National Archives and led to remote parts of Central and South America, Dateline NBC uncovered a classified WWII military program in which the United States essentially kidnapped more than 5,000 innocent civilians, Nov. 30, 1994.
  • Safe Haven

    WXXI-TV (Rochester, N.Y.) uses papers from the National Archives to report on America's only refugee shelter for victims of the holocaust, disputing the myth that the United States didn't know what was happening to the Jews of Europe during World War II.