Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "New York City" ...

  • The Daily News: Yellow School Bus Crisis

    This Daily News series dealt with yellow school buses and a crisis that included extensive delays, fraud in hiring bus staffers with criminal pasts, and how bus contracts were awarded.
  • The Daily News: The Capricious Hand of NYPD Discipline

    The New York City Police Department has long been a target of complaints from rand-and-file police officers who insist that high-ranking police officials meddle in and manipulate cases to protect favored officers and punish those in disfavor. This Daily News investigation uncovered evidence of failings within the system that led to the New York City Police Department forming a panel to review the system and make recommendations based on its findings.
  • The Daily News: New York City Housing Authority Expose

    The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) repeatedly lied to deny the findings of a lengthy investigation by Daily News reporter Greg. B. Smith that uncovered fetid conditions at the 175,000 apartments in the country's largest housing authority. Once the cover-up was exposed, NYCHA entered into an unprecedented consent decree to allow a federal monitor to oversee its operations.
  • Trump, Inc.

    Trump, Inc. is an open investigation by WNYC and ProPublica that has brought together listeners, readers, and many journalists to answer basic, vital questions about Trump the president, Trump the businessman, and the blurry lines between the two.
  • Food Plight: Cafeteria Inspections Reveal Critical Health Violations at New York City Schools

    Our reporters scoured reams of health inspection records and discovered that nearly half of New York City public school cafeterias were hit with at least one critical violation in 2017. A closer look found that the four dozen schools with the worst inspections records largely serve some of the city’s poorest students. The most sickening cases include schools where 600 rodent droppings and 1,500 flies were found in food preparation and consumption areas – conditions that are breeding grounds for potentially dangerous food-borne illnesses. Our team of students conceived of the story and used the data, obtained from the New York City Health Department under New York’s Freedom of Information Law, to create a filterable interactive graphic that parents can use to uncover details of violations found at their child’s school.
  • 'Not Wanted': Racial Bias at Trump Properties

    In the weeks leading up to the presidential election, the NBC News Investigative Unit and MSNBC broadcast an in-depth report on the Trump family business’s racist practices in the 1960's through the early 1980's, when African-Americans seeking to rent apartments in New York City were turned away because of the color of their skin.
  • Taking out a Reverse Mortgage Ruined My Life

    Dozens of senior citizens in New York City are caught in a rising tide of reverse- mortgage foreclosures that threaten to put some of the city’s most vulnerable residents out on the street. Because reverse-mortgage borrowers in foreclosure lack the protections — including mandatory settlement conferences and a 90-day notice requirement — instituted for traditional borrowers after the 2010 robo-signing scandal, these seniors are at risk of losing their homes far more quickly than forward-mortgage borrowers, who get an opportunity for negotiations overseen by the court. The debts at issue are relatively small, averaging just $10,000, but can trigger the loss of a home worth thirty times that amount or more.
  • NYPD Inc.

    In the wake of a massive corruption scandal in the New York City Police Department, WNYC investigated the outside finances of top NYPD officials. The reporting found numerous top cops earn money on the side with little oversight. Some of these side jobs and investments appear to be conflicts of interest, setting a bad example for the rank and file, and helping create a culture where corruption can breed.
  • Voiceless

    "Voiceless" exposes a flawed system in which access to interpretation and translation services can spell the difference between life and death for Spanish-speaking victims of domestic violence in New York City.
  • Fatal Foster Care: When newborns exposed to drugs in the womb are taken from their mothers, the results can be deadly

    Tighter drug laws in the United States increasingly mandate that newborns be stripped from drug-taking birth parents, and often placed in foster care. Even when the traces of drugs are minimal. But foster care is fraught with problems. Since 2000, at least 10 drug-exposed newborns have died in foster care — deaths identified in a New York City News Service analysis of court records, local news stories and interviews with family advocates across the nation. While a tiny fraction of the approximately 18,000 drug-exposed infants put into foster care over the same period, these tragedies show that foster care is not always a safer option for drug-exposed newborns. The number of foster care deaths is most likely larger since state officials often cite privacy laws barring them from disclosing details.