Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "North Korea" ...

  • 50 Years since the Chinese Cultural Revolution and North Korea: Does the Hydrogen Bomb Test Signal the North Korean Version of the Cultural Revolution?

    North Korea ran a hydrogen bomb test in January, 2016. Some think this signaled the start of Kim Jong-Un’s version of the Cultural Revolution because China’s Cultural Revolution began around the time of their nuclear bomb test in 1964 and their hydrogen bomb test in 1966. The Chinese Cultural Revolution was a sort of power struggle by Mao Zedong where he used the power of the public to get rid of his opponents within the Communist Party and climb back to the top over a period of 10 years starting in 1966. Chinese society ended up with deep scars from hatred and vengeance because of it. For the 50th year anniversary of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, we explore the current state of North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un’s regime, which is carrying out deep-rooted idolization tactics internally while running nuclear weapons and missile tests externally, and try to predict the future of North Korea.
  • The Pentagon’s $10-Billion Bet Gone Bad

    This body of work is the result of reporter David Willman’s investigations of the nation’s dauntingly complex missile-defense programs. The articles reveal how program after program was sold to Congress based on false and misleading claims – ultimately amounting to waste on a grand scale. The U.S. spent $2.2 billion alone for a giant, floating radar that was supposed to scan the skies for long-range missiles from North Korea or other “rogue” nations. But the radar spends most of the year mothballed at Pearl Harbor – and has never docked at its intended Alaskan berth. The “SBX” radar, Willman reported, will never fulfill its intended strategic mission.
  • Sony Hack

    Electronic infiltration has become the signature crime of the 21st century, and Fortune’s “Inside the Hack of the Century” tells the story of the most devastating attack to date: the cyberassault that brought Sony Pictures to its knees. Later attributed to the North Korean government, it spread terror not only throughout the movie industry, where theaters refused to show Sony’s The Interview for fear it would prompt reprisals from North Korea (which was furious that the movie depicted the assassination of its leader), but throughout corporate America.
  • Korean CIA's Scandal- Spy Evidence Forgery

    From 2008 to 2014, the NIS (National Intelligence Service)has found and indicted 21 spies disguised as North Korean defectors, but the Korean Center for investigative Journalism’s investigation revealed there was no evidence of any spy activities for 2 of the spies indicted after 2012. This discovery led to exoneration of those two people. The KCIJ also discovered that the NIS had submitted fabricated evidence against Mr. Yoo Woo-sung to the court. After the KCIJ reported this discovery through an investigation in China, the Korean court contacted the Chinese government, which confirmed that the document was forged. The Korean prosecution indicted 4 NIS employees who were involved in the fabrication, who then, in turn, received prison sentences.
  • Jenkins Photo Proof of Kidnapping?

    The web report address the practice in North Korea of kidnapping citizens of other Asian nations and holding them against their will in North Korea. The story focuses on the case of a Thai woman.
  • Nuclear Terror

    The CNN Presents Team went to Pakistan, Korea, Hong Kong Macau, Russia, and across the US for this report, talking to current and former intelligence officials, government sources, and scholars in this field. These experts pointed CNN to three countries they feared cold be the source of nuclear material for terrorists: Russia, Pakistan, and North Korea.
  • Gulag Nation

    This story chronicles the systematic human rights abuses at North Korean prisons, also called gulags. The author spoke with survivors and ex-prison workers who illustrate a horrific story of abuse and torture. Kim Jong Il and his regime deny that the camps exist, and up until very recently most other countries have ignored them.
  • Weapons of Mass Destruction

    Lewis Simons and Lynn Johnson travel around the world to give weapons of mass destruction a human face. They visit with survivors of Hiroshima, bio-weapon scientists from Russia and government officials in Iran. The piece attempts to quantify and qualify the threat of a biological, chemical or nuclear attack on the United States but the authors conclude it's practically impossible.
  • Clear and present danger

    The Washington Post Magazine describes the disastrous epidemics that can ensue, if smallpox is ever used as a biological weapon. The story reveals that smallpox is known as a highly contageous ancient scourge, which "has killed countless millions." The article focuses on the expert knowledge of Ken Alibek, former second-in-command manager of Biopreparat, the Soviet Union's vast biological weapons program. "Bioterrrism experts now believe the smallox virus exists in clandestine biowarfare laboratories in at least three, and possibly more, countries," the magazine reports. The article depicts the symptoms of the deadly disease, and warns about the unbelievable speed that infection can spread with.
  • Visit to a Small Planet

    "North Koreans worship their dead dictator, Kim Il Sung, and his son the reigning Kim Jong Il, despite the surreal nightmare of famine, isolation, repression, and nuclear peril the dynasty has spawned. In Pyongyang, the author wonders whether mass delusion is the only thing that keeps a people sane."