Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Pearl Harbor" ...

  • The Pentagon’s $10-Billion Bet Gone Bad

    This body of work is the result of reporter David Willman’s investigations of the nation’s dauntingly complex missile-defense programs. The articles reveal how program after program was sold to Congress based on false and misleading claims – ultimately amounting to waste on a grand scale. The U.S. spent $2.2 billion alone for a giant, floating radar that was supposed to scan the skies for long-range missiles from North Korea or other “rogue” nations. But the radar spends most of the year mothballed at Pearl Harbor – and has never docked at its intended Alaskan berth. The “SBX” radar, Willman reported, will never fulfill its intended strategic mission.
  • The Secret History of World War II

    A Boston Globe historical series provides an in-depth look into the intelligence machinations behind the World War II and the Cold War. The reporters reveal that Western Allies knew of Hitler's plans to systematically exterminate all of Europe's Jews several months earlier than previously thought; that US intelligence ran a covert operation to stall the creation of a Jewish state in the British colony of Palestine, fearing that such state would create generations of Islamic enmity; that American businesses were involved in commerce with the Nazis but also had espionage functions; and that the United States used 4,000 former German spies to spy on the Soviet Union. A major figure profiled in the series is a German Foreign Ministry official who had supplied the Americans with valuable inside documents but the CIA never really trusted him.
  • Should SATs Matter?

    Time reports on the growing controversy surrounding the SATs and looks at the alternatives to the exam that students have taken for more than 75 years. "The test's prominence ensures that shouting matches will erupt over it regularly. Usually one side says the SAT should die because it's racist; the other says it should flourish because it maintains standards. Their arguments are important but had started to seem pointless, since the number of SAT takers has increased virtually every year since Pearl Harbor."