Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Philip Meyer entry" ...

  • Walking into Danger

    Every other day on average in Chicago, a stranger tries to lure or force a child younger than 16 into a vehicle or building for an illegal purpose. An examination of the 530 most-recent cases revealed legal breakdowns that allowed the vast majority of the predators to avoid prison time or intensive sex offender treatment.
  • 5 years later, city fails diversity vow

    The focus of this project was the level of diversity within the municipality of Norwich, Conn., and whether the racial diversity of employees in city departments reflected the community at large. The stories reflected the findings in three areas: municipal, employees, police department employees, and school district employees.
  • State contracting scandal fallout

    In December of 2014, a high-ranking Texas health official resigned following weeks of questions by the Houston Chronicle and Austin American-Statesman about a $110 million no-bid contract. In the days and weeks after the resignation, the Houston Chronicle used sophisticated data analysis to show how the official had gotten away with egregiously stretching the rules of a $2 billion state purchasing program and to show how flaws in the program would make it easy for others to exploit it.
  • Unsettling Dust

    The series examined Oregon’s failure to protect workers and the public from breathing airborne asbestos fibers during or after building demolitions. The stories found that hundreds of Portland, Oregon homes had been demolished with asbestos in place, creating a cancer risk to anybody who might have breathed airborne asbestos as a result. A Washington region with stricter reporting requirements had a significantly higher compliance rate, we found. The investigation also found that Oregon is the only state failing to meet federal notification standards necessary to prevent contractors from doing large-scale demolitions without first removing asbestos.
  • The Doping Scandal: sport’s dirtiest secret

    This blood doping investigation exposed for the first time the extraordinary extent of cheating by athletes at the world's most prestigious events. The story was based on a database which was leaked by a whistle-blower who was disturbed by the failure of the authorities to tackle the problem. It provided a devastating insight into the blood test results of 5,000 athletes dating from the turn of the century to the London Olympics. Many were shown to have risked death by recklessly using transfusions or banned red-cell-boosting drugs which made their blood so thick they should have been seeking hospital treatment rather than competing. http://features.thesundaytimes.co.uk/web/public/2015/the-doping-scandal/index.html#/
  • S.C.'s Clunky Car Tax

    This series was a data-driven investigation of South Carolina’s methods for taxing vehicles, which are subject to property tax in the state. The property tax paid by a family with several vehicles can be more than the property tax they pay for their house, and the vehicle taxes are an important source of revenue for schools. The investigation found multiple flaws and inequities in the state’s methods for taxing vehicles, starting with auto value guides the state purchases but refuses to disclose.
  • Uphill Battle: How to Outsmart I-70 Ski Traffic

    This in-depth analysis of travel times, weather and car accident data from the I-70 mountain corridor helped Colorado skiers outsmart weekend traffic jams. The analysis led to an interactive online widget that can predict the best and worst times to drive based on day of the week, month of the year, and snowfall totals. As a result of the investigation, there were changes to I-70 highway management and Colorado state law. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvzPKnbL5sU&feature=youtu.be)
  • Census Records Show Asian Population Boom

    Using Census records, this story looks into a dramatic shift in the demographic profile of Fairfax County in Virginia, one of the largest counties in the country. The records showed different Asian subgroups growing at different rates in different parts of the county, trends that were personified by tracking down people whose stories reflected the data. There's also an interactive map to show which parts of the county were seeing the largest increase.
  • Deficient Hospices Rarely Punished

    After mining a database of inspection records, Huffington Post determined that hospices frequently go three years -- and sometimes much longer -- without any regulatory scrutiny. It also showed that when hospices break Medicare's rules, endangering the safety and even lives of their frail patients, they are virtually never punished. Medicare’s regulator has punished a hospice provider just 16 times in the last decade, despite carrying out 15,000 inspections and identifying more than 31,000 violations. In each instance, the hospice’s license was terminated -- the sole recourse for regulators when they confront a hospice that breaks the rules. The system of oversight designed to ensure sound practices in an industry that has quadrupled in size since 2000 simply has no means to assess fines or other punishments. The service, which at its best provides a caring, home-based alternative to hospitalization for terminally ill patients, is increasingly how Americans die. Yet virtually nothing is known about the quality of the companies providing that service. This story reveals to consumers those hospices that regulators have determined have the most problems -- and hopefully spurring government authorities to act.
  • A Racial Divide in Texas

    An analysis by students in UT-Austin's Spring 2015 investigative reporting class found that licensed peace officers in Texas are disproportionately white. In many communities, the face of law enforcement doesn’t look much different than it did before the Civil Rights Movement. In hundreds of cities, counties and towns across the state, white officers still dominate the ranks, even in communities where whites are the minority.