Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "ProPublica" ...

  • Hell and High Water

    The Houston area is home to 6.5 million people, as well as America’s largest oil refining and petrochemical complex. And it’s a sitting duck for the extreme storms and floods that will become more common as the effects of climate change become more pronounced. So why isn’t Texas — or the federal government — doing more to protect it? https://projects.propublica.org/houston/
  • Reliving Agent Orange

    Four decades after the Vietnam War, scientists are still learning how exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange has harmed veterans and their children. This report showed that the Department of Veterans Affairs has hesitated to compensate sick veterans, instead weighing political and financial costs in secret. To bolster their position, they found that government officials have routinely turned to a known skeptic of Agent Orange’s deadly effects – a scientist who has also been paid by the chemical makers. And they obtained internal VA data on hundreds of thousands of vets and conducted a first-of-its-kind analysis, producing new evidence suggesting a connection between Agent Orange and birth defects that experts say should force the government to take action. https://www.propublica.org/article/agent-orange-vietnam-veterans-their-families-share-stories-exposure https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/alvin-young
  • Dollars for Docs

    ProPublica first published Dollars for Docs, our comprehensive database of payments to doctors made by pharmaceutical companies for speaking, consulting, etc., in 2010. Millions of people have looked up their doctors, and hundreds of news organizations have used the data to tell important investigative stories. But it was only this year that, thanks to some painstaking work, we were able to match pharmaceutical payments with prescribing habits. And our findings were dispositive: Doctors who take payments tend to prescribe more brand-name drugs. Moreover, thousands of doctors who have had disciplinary actions against them by their state licensing boards are still getting pharma payments, and a greater share of physicians who work at for-profit hospitals take payments compared to those working at nonprofit or government facilities. https://projects.propublica.org/docdollars/ https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/d4d-hospital-lookup
  • Terror in Little Saigon

    FRONTLINE and ProPublica team up to investigate a wave of terror that targeted Vietnamese-American journalists. Uncovering a trail that leads from American cities to jungles in Southeast Asia, FRONTLINE and ProPublica shine new light on a series of unsolved murders and attacks. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/terror-in-little-saigon/
  • The Darren Sharper serial rape case

    This set of stories explains how former NFL star Darren Sharper was able to drug and rape women in multiple states over a few years without being stopped sooner. The stories were made possible by the collection of numerous public records as well as numerous interviews with sources at every level of the case, from witnesses to law enforcement officials, both for the record and not for attribution.
  • Insult to Injury: America’s Vanishing Worker Protections

    Driven by big business and insurers, states nationwide are dismantling workers’ compensation, slashing benefits to injured workers and making it more difficult for them to get care. Meanwhile employers are paying the lowest rates for workers’ comp insurance since the 1970s. http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workers-compensation-benefits-by-limb http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workers-comp-reform-by-state https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workcomp-company http://projects.propublica.org/graphics/workers-compensation-premiums-down http://www.npr.org/2015/03/05/390930229/grand-bargain-in-workers-comp-unravels-harming-injured-workers-further
  • Red Cross

    After the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Americans donated nearly half a billion dollars to the Red Cross, far more than any other charity received. We asked Red Cross leaders where the money went. They wouldn’t tell us. So we went to Haiti to find out. What ProPublica’s Justin Elliott and NPR’s Laura Sullivan discovered was squandered donations, unfounded claims of success, and a trail of resentment. The Red Cross claimed it provided homes to more than 130,000 Haitians. The reality: The charity built just six permanent homes in all of Haiti.
  • The Narco-Terror Trap

    This project traces the Drug Enforcement Administration’s use of a little-known statute of the Patriot Act to create a role for itself in the war on terror, based largely on unsubstantiated assertions that terrorists were using the drug trade to finance attacks against the United States. The statute, adopted with broad bi-partisan support, allows the D.E.A. to pursue so-called narco-terrorists anywhere in the world, even when none of their alleged crimes occurred on American soil. Between 2002 and 2008, the agency’s budget for foreign operations increased by some 75 percent, which supported expansions into Afghanistan, Eastern Europe, and West Africa. But an examination of the D.E.A.’s narco-terrorism cases reveals that most unraveled as they proceeded through court. The cases relied heavily on sting operations, and the only evidence of any links between terrorists and traffickers was concocted by the D.E.A., which used highly-paid informants to lure targets into staged narco-terrorism conspiracies. The first piece tells the story of three small-time smugglers from Mali who were arrested in West Africa, transported to New York and accused as narco-terrorists with links to Al-Qaeda. It explains how the D.E.A.’s narco-terrorism campaign began in the arrest-first-ask-questions-later period that followed 9/11. And it details the negligible contributions that the effort, whose total cost remains unknown, has made to keeping the country safe from either terrorists or drug traffickers. Nearly three years after the Malian’s arrest, a judge found that the men were not linked to Al-Qaeda, and that they had been motivated to participate in the D.E.A.’s fake conspiracy by an informant’s offer to pay them millions of dollars. The second piece uses an interactive comic – ProPublica’s first – to bring a sharper focus to the patterns in the DEA’s cases. It uses five different narco-terrorism operations in five different parts of the world. The interactivity of the comic allows readers to see how the agency’s stings use essentially the same script in order to make disparate targets fit the designated crime. https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/narco
  • G.I. Dough

    The U.S. government has wasted billions of dollars in Afghanistan – repeatedly ignoring history, warnings, local culture and common sense – to undertake one boondoggle project after another. Congress has barely blinked as the financial toll has mounted, and until now, no one has even added it all up. https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/afghan https://projects.propublica.org/cerp/ https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/boondoggle
  • Color of Debt

    The heart of our main story this year was a first-of-its-kind analysis of debt collection lawsuits. Crunching data from five years of court judgments from three metropolitan areas — St. Louis, Chicago and Newark — we found that, even controlling for income, the rate of judgments was twice as high in mostly black neighborhoods as it was in mostly white ones. This finding was drawn out through in-depth reporting on the ground in St. Louis. We focused on one neighborhood, Jennings, a mostly black suburb that borders Ferguson in north St. Louis County, to illustrate the impact. https://projects.propublica.org/garnishments/