Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Public employees" ...

  • Wrongful State Firings

    Arizona Republic senior reporter Craig Harris spent much of 2016 investigating wrongful firings of state employees, including a juvenile corrections teacher who was fighting breast cancer. His dogged reporting resulted in 47 public employees wrongly fired getting their jobs back and new job protections for state workers.
  • Wrongful State Firings

    Arizona Republic senior reporter Craig Harris spent much of 2016 investigating wrongful firings of state employees, including a juvenile corrections teacher who was fighting breast cancer. His dogged reporting resulted in 47 public employees wrongly fired getting their jobs back and new job protections for state workers. http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/09/08/gov-doug-ducey-forces-out-juvenile-corrections-chief-dona-markley-after-questionable-firings/90094760/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/10/31/fired-arizona-workers-inundate-call-center-appealing-get-jobs-back/93083666/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/11/23/gov-doug-ducey-fires-arizona-des-chief-tim-jeffries/94350606/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/12/23/arizona-rehire-40-des-workers-227-remain-fired/95795356/
  • Public Salary project

    This entry consists of stories culled from a massive request for government compensation from hundreds of government agencies, cities, counties, school, college and special districts. This projects follows the money. The data is made public through data bases on our web sites and culled through by investigative reporter Thomas Peele, who roots out stories from deep in the data, including ones about secret pension boosting perks, officials paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for not working, government managers sitting on huge banks of unused vacation time to cash in at retirement, part-time elected officials who do little work while being paid hundreds of dollars and an hour, long forgotten politicians receiving free life-time government health insurance decades are leaving office. The project routinely ferrets out information about the spending of public money that not even those in charge of government agencies are aware of until Peele tells them: "Wow,” said James Fang, a member of the board of the BART transit district when informed data showed the agencies former general manager, who had resigned two years earlier in the midst if being fired, had remained in the agency's payroll for years, raking in hundreds of thousands of dollars and jacking up her future pension. “She was still on the payroll? I did not know this. It’s startling.”
  • Supreme Court Spat

    This story, produced by the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism and Wisconsin Public Radio, was first to report on a June 13 altercation in which Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice David Prosser placed his hands on the neck of fellow Justice Ann Walsh Bradley in a dispute in her office in front of other members of the court. The article reported that the argument concerned the timing of the court's release of a decision upholding Republican Gov. Scott Walker's controversial bill to curb the collective bargaining rights of the state's public employees, and that the Capitol Police Department and the Wisconsin Judicial Commission were informed of the incident. The story also revealed that the Capitol police chief had come in to speak to the court's seven members about it. Although the initial story relied on anonymous sources, all of the facts were subsequently confirmed by on-the-record interviews, and later by police reports.
  • Birthdates Controversy

    Government agencies and legislators in Oklahoma had fought unsuccessfully to make the birth dates of public employees confidential despite state open records laws. The investigation found that the state makes millions of dollars selling birth dates of regular citizens.
  • Watchdog website and its web pages

    The Oklahoman/NewsOK.com started this project in 2008 with the Right to Know page, a collection of databases developed internally to go along with stories and links to relevant public information. That site became part of the Watchdog page in 2009. In 2010, the staff continued to evolve the Watchdog page with "mini-sites" of investigative topics, such as a political corruption case at the Oklahoma Legislature; the staff's FOI fight over the birth dates of public employees; and allegations of bid-rigging with a married lawmaker and lobbyist for a private company seeking a state juvenile justice contract. Other "mini-sites" under Watchdog include ongoing coverage of the state Department of Human Services and the federal stimulus package.
  • 2010 Public Salaries

    Using the California Public Records Act, the Bay Area News compiled a database with the salary information of nearly one million public employees.
  • Good as gold: State pensions facing scrutiny

    Public employees in Ohio have better wages and benefits than the taxpayers who support them. Taxpayer money funds the system which allows workers to retire a decade or more sooner than workers in the private sector. Also, more than one in four public school superindentents had received pension payments and salary simultaneously.
  • A Gold-Plated Gravy Train

    School districts and other local governments falsely reported private consultants as public employees so the consultants could get public pensions and health benefits, at a cost of millions of dollars to the taxpayers. In addition, scores of school administrations retired with six-figure pensions, only to return to work in so-called interim school jobs. That enabled them to collect six-figure salaries on top of their already rich pensions and health benefits. Both practices were done under the radar, known only to a club of insiders who reaped the benefits.
  • Retiree' benefits under fire; Car perks add up for taxpayers; Were city workers' nest eggs too generous?

    The series examined lash perks of government workers in Broward and Palm Beach counties. The stories found that even as local governments cried poverty because of state-mandated tax cuts, they continued to heap generous benefits to public employees - even if it meant imposing tax hikes down the road.