Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Salt Lake" ...

  • University of Utah Student Killed; Who Is Murder Suspect Ayoola Ajayi?

    Twelve days after the disappearance of University of Utah student, Mackenzie Lueck this summer, and following an exhaustive investigation by law enforcement, police arrested and formally charged the suspect in her death, Ayoola Adisa Ajayi. Ajayi faces four charges in connection to Lueck’s violent murder, including aggravated murder and aggravated kidnapping. KSL Investigators knew Ajayi was the person of interest in this case because he owned the small property in Salt Lake where multiple search warrants were executed in the case prior to his arrest. Before authorities released his name to the public, KSL Investigators worked to learn everything they could about the 31-year-old immigrant, originally from Africa, so we could break the investigation as soon as the suspect’s name was released. Although much of a person’s immigration status is private information, representatives with the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office confirmed Ajayi is a lawful legal resident and he was at the time of his arrest. However, the KSL Investigators exposed how he came to this country and revealed possible oversight by Utah State University and the federal government when he dropped out of school a number of times and was posting online about seeking to find a wife to keep his citizenship status.
  • Girls in polygamous Kingston Group continue to marry as young as 15, records show, sometimes leaving Utah to marry cousins

    While much of the focus of any polygamous group is on marriages that happen outside the law, an investigation showed how in one sect girls as young as 15 are driven or flown out of Utah to marry legally. This is done to find states that are less restrictive about the ages of the brides and grooms and where cousin marriages are legal, and in order to keep girls in the sect.
  • Why'd You Steal My...

    Thieves are stealing bikes from garages.. and packages from front porches in Salt Lake City. And it's happening a lot. The problem is.. most of the suspects are never caught and the stolen property is rarely recovered. So we decided to 1) find out why there's such little success in arresting and recovering; and 2) catch a few of the thieves on our own to see if there's a larger ring of criminal activity. Using surveillance cameras, a GPS unit, and a lot of time.. The KSL Investigators literally chased down the thieves, shedding light on how these seemingly minor crimes lead to activity that is much, much worse. As a result.. police have started to step up their game. http://www.ksl.com/?nid=1171&sid=37154763 https://ksl.com/?sid=34605937&nid=1171
  • No Parking

    The City of Salt Lake is short millions of dollars in unpaid parking citations. The KSL Investigators dug around looking into the worst offenders, and found a government agency topping the list... several times over. More specifically, the United States Postal Service. They owe the city a lot of money and refuse to pay up. So, how are postal workers getting away with it?
  • Utah's top cop goes down

    A yearlong investigation of Utah Attorney General John Swallow, who ended up resigning after less than a year in office, as a result of stories The Salt Lake Tribune broke. This entry represents a sampling of the nearly 200 stories, sidebars and graphics about the scandal, which transfixed Utah's political establishment and Tribune readers.
  • UTOPIA

    Behind vaunted promises of lightning-speed Internet access and an economic boon for 11 Utah cities lay a basic budgetary fact: The municipal fiber-optic network known as UTOPIA had been in operation for more than 10 years while consistently losing taxpayers millions of dollars annually and never reaching completion. So when a state audit flagged chronic fiscal problems with the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, The Salt Lake Tribune took an in-depth look at all aspects of the troubled project — from the point of view of its sponsoring city governments whose budgets were jeopardized by mounting UTOPIA debts. Wading through thousands of city documents, meeting minutes and technical specs obtained through open-records requests and interviewing dozens of sources, Tribune reporters brought to light a picture of mismanagement and financial crisis even more dire than one painted by state investigators.
  • Injection Wells - The Hidden Risks of Pumping Waste Underground

    Over the last several decades, U.S. industries have dumped more than 30 trillion gallons of toxic waste – a volume roughly four times that of Utah’s Great Salt Lake -- into injection wells deep beneath the earth’s surface. These wells epitomize the notion of out of sight, out of mind, entombing chemicals too dangerous to discard in rivers or soil. The Environmental Protection Agency is responsible for overseeing this invisible disposal system, setting standards that, above all, are supposed to safeguard sources of drinking water at a time when water has become increasingly precious. Abrahm Lustgarten’s series, “Injection Wells: the Hidden Risks of Pumping Waste Underground,” lays out in frightening detail just how far short regulators have fallen in carrying out that mission. His analysis of hundreds of thousands of inspection records showed that wells often fail mechanical integrity tests meant to ensure contaminants aren’t leaking into water supplies and that companies repeatedly violate basic rules for safe disposal. EPA efforts to strengthen regulation of underground injection have been stymied time and again by the oil and gas industry, among the primary users of disposal wells. As the number of wells for drilling waste has grown to more than 150,000 nationwide, regulators haven’t kept pace, leaving gaps that have led to catastrophic breakdowns. And Lustgarten’s most surprising finding was that the EPA has knowingly permitted the energy industry to pollute underground reservoirs, handing out more than 1,500 “exemptions” allowing companies to inject waste and other chemicals into drinking water aquifers.
  • Salt Lake Tribune reporting, editorial stance, lobbying efforts to help keep Utah's open record law intact

    In the waning days of the 2011 Utah Legislature, lawmakers quietly introduced House Bill 477, a measure designed to dramatically weaken the state's open records law, the Government Records Access and Management Act (GRAMA), in effect for the past two decades. Work done by The Salt Lake Tribune led the way to the recall of HB477.
  • Salt Lake Tribune, editorial stance, Lobbying keeps Utah's open record laws intact

    "After a significant change in Utah's open records laws passed legislation without typical due process. The paper's editorial and government relations staff aggressively reported on the claims from both supporters and opponents of the bill."
  • "Logan Canal Collapse Investigation"

    A massive mudslide that destroyed numerous residential homes and killed a mother and her two children could have been prevented. According to an investigation by The Salt Lake Tribune, the owners of the irrigation canal that collapsed and caused the mudslide neglected to fix existing problems with the waterway, or warn residents of the potential danger. Meanwhile, Logan city received warnings that the canal posed a threat to residents, but did not act upon them.