Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "San Francisco" ...

  • SF Chronicle: Risky Retreats

    An expose of the questionable, potentially dangerous methods that have been employed for decades at immersive, days-long “leadership” retreats held for high school teens across the U.S.
  • S.F. Chronicle: Dangerous Ground

    An investigation into fraud and failed oversight in the cleanup and development of America’s largest Superfund site, the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in San Francisco.
  • Drivers Under Siege

    They are not police officers or firefighters, yet Bay Area bus drivers who work for the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) face some of the most dangerous working conditions with the fewest protections. Using public records and video footage, our analysis found that bus drivers with AC Transit faced more violent assaults than any other district in the San Francisco Bay Area. After we started asking questions, AC Transit announced it would test out new bus shields to protect drivers and California lawmakers introduced a federal bill in Congress with bipartisan support that will require transit districts across the country to reassess their safety measures. The new law would allocate $25 million a year for five years to pay for shields, de-escalation training, systems for transit agencies nationwide to track assault data and report that data to the Department of Transportation.
  • Bay Area News Group: Burned Out

    An exclusive data analysis that revealed how fire inspectors across the San Francisco Bay Area routinely fail to perform state-required safety inspections at schools and apartment buildings -- and how, despite the potential for tragedy, there are no consequences — and nobody paying attention — to make sure they are getting the job done.
  • Insult to Injury

    As Tesla races to revolutionize the automobile industry and build a more sustainable future, it has left its factory workers in the past, still painfully vulnerable to the dangers of manufacturing. Our reporting shows that Tesla prioritized speed over safety, ignored its own safety experts and denied proper medical care to injured workers. And in order to make its safety record look better than it really is, Tesla has kept injuries off the books. Our radio segments take listeners into the factory and behind the scenes, as whistleblowers tell their secrets and workers show the toll on their lives.
  • The Profiteers

    The tale of the Bechtel family dynasty is a classic American business story. It begins with Warren A. “Dad” Bechtel, who led a consortium that constructed the Hoover Dam. From that auspicious start, the family and its eponymous company would go on to “build the world,” from the construction of airports in Hong Kong and Doha, to pipelines and tunnels in Alaska and Europe, to mining and energy operations around the globe. Today Bechtel is one of the largest privately held corporations in the world, enriched and empowered by a long history of government contracts and the privatization of public works, made possible by an unprecedented revolving door between its San Francisco headquarters and Washington. Bechtel executives John McCone, Caspar Weinberger, and George P. Shultz segued from leadership at the company to positions as Director of the CIA, Secretary of Defense, and Secretary of State, respectively. Like all stories of empire building, the rise of Bechtel presents a complex and riveting narrative. In The Profiteers, Sally Denton, whom The New York Times called “a wonderful writer,” exposes Bechtel’s secret world and one of the biggest business and political stories of our time.
  • Sea Level Rise

    The Bay Area's current waterfront building frenzy includes at least $21 billion in housing and commercial construction in low-lying areas that climate scientists say could flood by the end of the century. In examining approval processes for new buildings on the edge of San Francisco Bay, our team found that some cities are greenlighting waterfront development without planning for the long term or fully accounting for the future costs of reconfiguring large projects to resist flooding.
  • Hazardous Waste Regulation Challenges in California

    Despite a number of organizations overseeing the metal shredding industry, regulators have struggled to be effective in their efforts, possibly jeopardizing environmental and societal health. A deep dive into the Sims Recycling Plant in Silicon Valley uncovered decades of violations and millions of dollars of fines. And the failure to effectively police these plants are hurting local residents: in late 2013, the San Francisco Peninsula was engulfed in noxious black smoke when fires broke out at the facility.
  • Subversives

    "Subversives" reveals the FBI's covert operations at the University of California during the Cold War through the bureau's involvement with three iconic figures who clashed at Berkeley in the sixties: Governor Ronald Reagan; UC President Clark Kerr; and student leader Mario Savio. By tracing these narratives, "Subversives" tells a dramatic story of FBI illegal break-ins, infiltrations, planted news stories, poison pen letters, and secret detention lists.
  • Black Arts

    This is an investigation of San Francisco's for-profit Academy of Art University, the country's largest private art school. I examine the questionable business model that produced a nearly billion-dollar fortune for its owners, the Stephens family. Meanwhile, the university produced abysmal graduation rates, high levels of student debt and poor job placement. Former employees alleged illegal compensation for high-pressure recruiting tactics. And the university had serious land-use violations on most of its 40-some prime properties, benefiting, critics say, from close ties to leading San Francisco politicians.