Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Serial killer" ...

  • 48 Hours: The Hollywood Ripper

    “48 Hours: The Hollywood Ripper” follows CBS News correspondent Maureen Maher’s eleven-year investigation into Michael Gargiulo, a now-convicted serial killer known as the Hollywood Ripper.
  • ABC10: GSK

    I created a StoryMap of all the Golden State Killer's alleged crimes using both existing maps/data from the FBI and the Sacramento County District Attorney's Office, as well as locations from a local author chronicling the Golden State Killer. Moreover, I edited/produced the TV piece explaining the map.
  • KC Star: Stalk. Murder. Repeat.

    Robert J. Gross was a longtime serial murder suspect in Kansas City, implicated in at least four killings over five decades. But he had never been charged in any of them, even though police had been tracking him for years.
  • Serial Secrets: Catching a Killer

    "Serial Secrets: Catching a Killer" chronicles a Vermont police investigation into the mysterious disappearance of a suburban couple. Bill and Lorraine Currier were abducted from their Vermont home and brutally murdered by a serial killer. He would evade authorities for more than year. In that time, he would kill again. My coverage was the first to reveal his identity and how dangerous he really was. Despite being stonewalled at every turn, I was able to bring viewers exclusive reports that eventually sparked debate about the use of unnamed sources and the public's right to know details about an ongoing criminal case. The FBI has since revealed that Israel Keyes planned his murders years in advance, burying "kill kits" across the country. He confessed to murdering at least eight victims over the past decade before committing suicide in December. The details of his kills still haunt Vermonters today.
  • Murder Mysteries

    Scripps Howard developed a computer algorithim that can identify suspicious clusters of homicides of women that have a significant chance of containing serial murders.
  • Serial Killer Could Have Been Stopped

    After 11 bodies are found in a Cleveland man's home, CBS News questions why police hadn't known a serial killer had been on the loose. The exclusive investigation finds that the police had consistently dismissed rape accusations against Sowell.
  • Murder Mysteries

    Schripps Howard News Service has conducted the most complete accounting ever made of homicide victims in the United States. Aggressive use of state and local Freedom of Information laws allowed the wire service to assemble a database of 525,742 homicides, including records of 15,322 killings never reported to the FBI. The "Murder Mysteries" project calculated the homicide clearance rate for every police department in the U.S., prompting four departments to promise reforms. Scripps also developed an algorithm that identified 161 suspicious clusters of unsolved homicides involving women of similar age killed through similar means. Authorities in Gary, Ind., and Youngstown, Ohio, Launched new investigations into possible serial murder in their communities as a result of this project.
  • "Murder Mysteries"

    The Scripps Howard News Service has compiled an extensive database of homicide victims in the U.S., by using state and local Freedom of Information laws. The project revealed records of more than 15,000 murders that were "never reporter to the FBI." As a result of the series, several police departments "promised reform," and new investigations into old murders were launched.
  • Fugitive in the Philippines

    The story investigates an “unsolved disappearance and murder of a little boy and two mothers”. It is believed the serial killer is hiding in Southeast Asia, which is where the investigation led and even brought them to the suspect. He was the last known person to see the victims alive and detectives believe the” interview has helped them gather additional information”.
  • Homicide in LA

    This series is a story about a serial killer on the loose in South Los Angeles. The story broke after a lead from the one and only surviving victim, who agreed to meet only with LA Weekly. LA Weekly kept the story alive by helping detectives by writing stories and keeping the existence of the serial killer alive. Though, after the story had gone away, 20 years later it has reappeared as the serial killer struck again.