Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Sexual assaults" ...

  • CNN Investigates - Uber Sexual Assault

    CNN Investigates’ multi-part, five month-long reporting project focused on allegations of sexual assaults by drivers of the rideshare giant Uber. Uber pitches itself in advertising as a “safe ride home,” but CNN’s reporting found that in case after case across the country, Uber drivers prey on female passengers, and Uber’s background check process allowed thousands of convicted criminals to become drivers. CNN’s investigation led to safety changes in the Uber app, a change in the background check policy, and a change in Uber’s policy that forced sexual assault victims into arbitration and compelled them to sign non-disclosure agreements.
  • Juvenile Sexual Assaults Victims of Dr. William Ayres: The Forgotten Victims

    For forty years, hundreds of juveniles in San Mateo County, California were sexually assaulted in court-ordered sessions by prominent child psychiatrist Dr. William Ayres. But when the victims spoke out, they were either ignored or punished by authorities. It wasn’t until 2002, when journalist Victoria Balfour contacted police on behalf of one of Ayres’ victims, a private patient, that a criminal case against Ayres began to get traction. In 2013, Ayres, a former President of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, pleaded no contest to molesting boys who had been his private patients. He was sentenced to eight years in prison. However, Balfour had a fierce belief that the voices of his juvenile victims urgently needed to be heard in this case as well. When agencies in San Mateo County whose job it was to protect juveniles rebuffed her request to find the juvenile victims, Balfour embarked on a 3 and-a-half year project to find them herself. Working on a detective's theory that most of Ayres' juvenile victims were now in prison, she wrote to more than 300 inmates from San Mateo County and asked if they had been evaluated by Ayres. Balfour’s article recounts the horrifying and heartbreaking responses she received from inmates about their abuse by Dr. Ayres, one of the most prolific child molesters in recent California history.
  • Degree of Deception

    A lawsuit filed by a former Queens University accusing her alma mater of mishandling her reported sexual assault prompted us to dig deeper and find out how other area universities were handling sexual assault on campus. Our questions prompted four schools to amend their Clery reports,a report required by federal law outlining the number of certain types of crimes that happen on campus, to add additional reported sexual assaults. Following our first story into Queens University, the school settled its lawsuit and amended its Clery report. Ultimately, our investigation prompted four colleges and universities to amend their Clery reports to add sexual assaults. https://youtu.be/fJoKjUmt3DU
  • Peace Corps Failing Volunteers

    CBS News has obtained evidence that the Peace Corps is struggling with sexual assaults in its ranks. A survey shows nearly 20 percent of volunteers experienced some type of sexual assault, and more than half of those say they suffered repeat attacks. Pressure to change a culture of victim-blaming goes back years, but some survivors still claim they are blamed or punished. Kris Van Cleave reports.
  • The Darren Sharper serial rape case

    This set of stories explains how former NFL star Darren Sharper was able to drug and rape women in multiple states over a few years without being stopped sooner. The stories were made possible by the collection of numerous public records as well as numerous interviews with sources at every level of the case, from witnesses to law enforcement officials, both for the record and not for attribution.
  • Border Patrol Sex Assaults

    CBS News investigation revealed “disturbing” sex abuse within the country’s largest law enforcement agency US Customs and Border Protection. A former top official of the agency told us for the first time that he notified his superiors of a “spike” in sexual misconduct by agents that was significantly higher than any other federal law enforcement agency as well as other large metropolitan police departments. As a result of our story – the DHS integrity council met with our whistleblower and then issued a series of recommended changes to CBP.
  • Breaking The Silence: Addressing Sexual Assault On Campus

    An investigation into how the University of Kansas pursued one rape case (http://huff.to/W8uLVy), where the assailant confessed, resulted in the harshest sanction being probation, specifically because the university wanted to avoid being "punitive." Meanwhile, the city police decline to investigate underage drinking at a fraternity where victim had become intoxicated, and the district attorney decides to close the case until HuffPost contacts him. The Breaking the Silence series uses a range of perspectives to explore the lenient and lackadaisical approach of colleges across America to sexual assaults committed on their campuses. The first piece included here is an investigation into how the University of Kansas handled one rape case in which the assailant confessed, and whose harshest sanction was probation — specifically because the university wanted to avoid being "punitive," citing a higher-ed trade group’s guidance. The city police declined to investigate underage drinking at the fraternity where the victim had become intoxicated, and the district attorney decided to close the case until HuffPost contacted him. Another, data-driven piece examines whether schools like the University of Kansas are anomalies. We concluded that most colleges opt not to remove sexual assault offenders from campus, with many citing the same higher-ed trade group's guidance to be "educative, not punitive" in their approach to punishing rape and sexual misconduct. Fewer than one-third of cases where a student is found responsible for sexual assault result in expulsion In our third piece, we found that even when a school does investigate and punish a student for sexual assault, it doesn't stop the student from transferring to another campus, sometimes without anyone at the new school knowing about his past misconduct.
  • The Secret Inside the Postal Service

    This is the secret inside the US Postal Service it did not want to talk about and used the real threat of arrest in its effort to kill the story. But what the News4 I-Team uncovered about sexual assaults happening within this massive government agency now has the US Inspector General’s Office investigating and Congress threatening hearings.
  • Why Did The U.S. Lock Up These Women With Men?

    For transgender immigrants fleeing transphobic countries, asylum in the U.S. can mean the difference between life and death. But instead of finding refuge from persecution sexual assault and harassment in the U.S., transgender women are routinely thrown into America’s immigration detention system where they experience the same attacks they were were escaping in the first place. A six-month Fusion investigation revealed for the first time ever that immigration authorities detain about 75 transgender people on any given night. The investigation also found that while transgender detainees only account for one of every 500 detainees, one of every five victims of confirmed sexual assaults in detention involved transgender victims
  • Military Sexual Assaults

    The Baltimore Sun explored the little covered issue of sexual assault of men in the military, finding that justice is rarely sought in those cases even though statistics show that more men than women in the military are sexually assaulted each year.