Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "Social Security" ...

  • Dead or Alive

    Scott Pelley reports on the thousands of errors to the Social Security Administration's Death Master File. Such mistakes can result in continued payments in the names of the dead not on the list and identity headaches for those mistakenly put on the list who are very much alive.
  • The Tax Refund Scam

    All con artists need is a computer and an easily obtained list of stolen social security numbers to perpetrate a scam that has cost the U.S. Treasury billions of dollars in fraudulent tax refunds. Steve Kroft reports on this scam that is getting out of hand because the IRS hasn't found a way to stop it.
  • Billion Dollar Judge

    In 2016, the Social Security Disability trust fund is scheduled to become the first Federal program to run out of money. As Congress and the President race to find a way to save the fund, CBS 21 discovered an outlying disability judge who has approved billions in disability benefits over the past decade. This judge has approve six times more than the average disability judge and more than twice as much as America’s second highest active judge. Three weeks after CBS 21 reported on his record, Judge Charles Bridges was subpoenaed to testify before the United State Congress where this entry was discussed under oath and is now in Congressional record.
  • Strings Attached

    One of Tampa’s largest homeless charities, New Beginnings of Tampa, for years made money off its destitute residents through a legally questionable “work therapy” program. Homeless people -- including the mentally ill and addicted -- were required to work unpaid concessions shifts at professional sporting events and concerts, and in construction, telemarketing, and a bevy of other industries in exchange for shelter. While claiming to provide counseling to the homeless sent to the charity by local law enforcement, hospitals, and the courts, the charity employed no one clinically trained to counsel the mentally ill or addicted, and required residents to sign over food stamps, Social Security checks, and any other income. Many former residents said they worked there for months -- and should have earned more than they owed in rent -- but were never paid.
  • Death of a Nursing Home

    An investigation of the high rate of bankruptcies of nursing homes serving minority and low-income communities shows that their financial problems can be traced back to the low reimbursement rates paid by Medicaid, and that the Medicaid law is based on amendments made to the Social Security Law of 1935 inserted by states’ rights advocates in Congress who wanted to preserve the system of economic exploitation and social segregation of the South.
  • Nazi Social Security

    Dozens of suspected Nazi war criminals and SS guards collected millions of dollars in U.S. Social Security benefits after being forced out of the United States, an Associated Press investigation found. The payments, underwritten by American taxpayers, flowed through a legal loophole that gave the U.S. Justice Department leverage to persuade Nazi suspects to leave the U.S. If they agreed to go, or simply fled before deportation, they could keep their Social Security, according to interviews and internal U.S. government records. Social Security benefits became tools, U.S. diplomatic officials said, to secure agreements in which Nazi suspects would accept the loss of citizenship and voluntarily leave the United States.
  • The Suspicion Within

    Even before a former U.S. intelligence contractor exposed the secret collection of Americans’ phone records, the Obama administration was pressing a government-wide crackdown on security threats that requires federal employees to keep closer tabs on their co-workers and exhorts managers to punish those who fail to report their suspicions.
  • Privacy on the Line

    “Privacy on the Line” documented security breaches and fraud in the implementation of a $2 billion federal phone subsidy for low-income families. We found tens of thousands of applicants to Lifeline, were put at heightened risk for identity theft when more than 170,000 sensitive records were posted publicly online. While researching companies participating in the Lifeline program, Scripps investigative reporter Isaac Wolf discovered a data breach touching residents of 26 states.
  • Disabled System

    The series examined the Social Security disability program, which faces major financial pressures and could exhaust resources as soon as 2017. The series revealed an uneven process for awarding benefits that has become more focused on expediting cases than the quality of decisions.
  • Social Security Disability Claims

    Social Security Disability benefits can take years, leave families in financial ruin, even when doctors say they are eligible for benefits.