Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "South Carolina" ...

  • 48 Hours: “Fatal Crossing”

    “Fatal Crossing” is a 48 Hours original investigation into the mysterious circumstances surrounding the deaths of Kadie Major, 26, and her 10-month-old daughter, River Lynn. In January 2008, their bodies were found along railroad tracks in Moncks Corner, SC. After a one-week investigation, the Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office determined that Kadie –five months pregnant— had murdered her daughter before killing herself by jumping in front of a moving train.
  • Post and Courier (SC): Dan Johnson investigation

    In a system with little scrutiny, prosecutor Dan Johnson used his office accounts like an ATM machine, dipping into public dollars to travel the globe, host lavish parties and buy everything from gym memberships to plane tickets to the Las Vegas strip.
  • Locked Up For Being Poor In South Carolina Jails

    An analysis of bond data from multiple sources shows poor defendants who struggle to pay a cash bond spend more time in jail before trail and are more likely to be convicted of a crime or plead guilty than those who have the means to post bond. http://wspa.com/2016/05/05/locked-up-for-being-poor-in-south-carolina-jails/
  • Racial Slurs Are Woven Deep Into The American Landscape

    The removal of the confederate flag from the Statehouse in South Carolina spawned the re-evaluation of confederate symbols across the South. We were curious to know how many other locations across the US still had names that would be considered derogatory in today’s society. We used Vocativ’s proprietary technology identify cities, towns, lakes, springs, mines and local landmarks with a potentially hurtful name. We then created a series of data visualizations including an interactive map that can searched by state to show hundreds of federally recognized places across the nation that include racial slurs in their names. Some examples are Dead Negro Hollow in Tennessee, Wetback Tank in New Mexico and Dead Injun Creek in Oregon.
  • Shots Fired

    Shots Fired is The Post and Courier's investigation into every police shooting in South Carolina since 2009. Shots Fired exposed how the state failed to properly investigate numerous police shootings, especially when officers fired at vehicles. The series also exposed how minorities were disproportionately affected by police tactics that often lead to gunfire. http://data.postandcourier.com/shots-fired/page/6 http://data.postandcourier.com/shots-fired/data http://data.postandcourier.com/shots-fired/page/1 http://data.postandcourier.com/shots-fired/
  • Capitol Gains

    A unique in-depth investigation into South Carolina’s loophole-ridden campaign finance system where vague reporting requirements and lax oversight allow lawmakers to profit from public office and to use their campaign war chests like personal ATM machines.
  • S.C.'s Clunky Car Tax

    This series was a data-driven investigation of South Carolina’s methods for taxing vehicles, which are subject to property tax in the state. The property tax paid by a family with several vehicles can be more than the property tax they pay for their house, and the vehicle taxes are an important source of revenue for schools. The investigation found multiple flaws and inequities in the state’s methods for taxing vehicles, starting with auto value guides the state purchases but refuses to disclose.
  • Racial Slurs Are Woven Deep Into The American Landscape

    The removal of the confederate flag from the Statehouse in South Carolina spawned the re-evaluation of confederate symbols across the South. We felt this issue went much deeper among various racial groups across the entire the entire nation. We were curious to know how many other locations across the US still had names that would be considered derogatory in today’s society.
  • Till Death Do Us Part

    Awash in guns, saddled with ineffective laws and lacking enough shelters for victims of domestic abuse, South Carolina is among the nation's deadliest states for women, who are killed at a rate of one every 12 days. The series exposed numerous failings, including limited police training, inadequate laws, a lack of punishment, insufficient education for judges, a dearth of victim support, and traditional beliefs about the sanctity of marriage that keep victims locked in the cycle of abuse. These factors combine in a corrosive stew that, three times in the last decade, made South Carolina the No. 1 state in the rate of women killed by men.
  • SCDSS: The System Failed

    A News19 report on a 4 year old boy named Robert Guinyard Jr., who despite multiple reports of abuse, died in state care, put the spotlight on former South Carolina Department of Social Services (DSS) State Director Lillian Koller. Our investigation found multiple instances where policy says DSS should have stepped in. It would take the agency two months to publicly admit to a Senate Oversight Committee that policies were not followed in the case. The DSS Deputy State Director for Child Protective Services told us, “the system failed Robert.” News 19 reported at least 36 stories about DSS in 2014 on-air, online, and on mobile platforms. Our investigation led to the resignation of the agency’s State Director, policy changes in the Child Protective Services division, and increased funding to an understaffed guardian ad litum group that advocates for kids in state custody.