Stories

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Search results for "Supreme Court" ...

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    The Star Tribune alledges that several U.S. Supreme Court justices and federal judges accepted luxurious trips and other benefits from West Publishing, Co. during a period when they made decisions, on and off the bench, worth millions to the Twin cities company. (March, 1995)
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    It's been seven years since the Supreme Court severly cut back union dues authority, yet the Labor Board still hasn't moved to enforce that ruling. Why not? A four-month ILR investigation turns up the usual Washington suspects--politics, power, money, and egos. (Jan. 27, 1995)
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    The State examined South Carolina's system for disciplining lawyers and dscovered that for years, a license to practice law was a license to steal. Under South Carolina's system few lawyers were penalized. Even those who were diciplined by the Supreme Court for stealing from their clients were rarely criminally prosecuted. (April 8 - Nov. 3, 1995)
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    U.S. Supreme Court Justices and federal judges accupted luxurious trips and other benefits from West Publishing Co. during a period when they made decisions, on and off the bench, worth millions to the company that was fighting for dominance in the legal publishing industry. The series and follow-up articles provide a rare look into the federal judiciary, including the secret world of judicial discipline and the failure of judges to comply with financial disclosure requirements. (March 5 & 6, 1995)
  • Beyond death row

    In 1972 and 1976, 174 condemned men & women were given a reprieve by the state supreme court. Two decades later, 47 have paroled. The Sacramento Bee investigates where they are now, and what they did with their second chance at life?
  • Stolen Lives

    Life found that since 1976, when the Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty, 53 people have been released from death row because of probable innocence--a triumph for the accused, but an inescapable sign that the system has not been able to prevent the possibility of wrongful conviction. The people in this article were sentenced to die, then vindicated and allowed to go home--if a home awaited them.
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    Allegations are made against American Family Insurance, a leading Madison-based homeowner's insurance firm, because data shows a dramatic drop in market shares in the central city. The issue has taken national significance since eight black homeowners filed a lawsuit in 1990. This case is seen as the leading case in the U.S. on discrimination in insurance. (June 15, 1993)
  • Life & Death

    Welsh-Huggins analyzed Ohio's capital punishment system and found a number of disturbing trends. Among his findings were that "offenders who killed whites were twice as likely to be sentenced to death as those who killed blacks." He also found many errors in the state's data on the death penalty.
  • Who Owns the Law?

    The Star Tribune investigated West Publishing Co., a $600 million enterprise that has dominated parts of the legal publishing industry for decades, and found that seven U.S. Supreme Court justices and federal judges have had questionable dealings with the firm. The justices and judges accepted luxurious trips and other benefits from West Publishing Co. during a period when they made decisions, on and off the bench, worth millions to the Twin Cities company
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    The Journal found that forty years after the Supreme Court struck down separate but equal education, white children in the South are still a favored class -- they win placement in classes for the gifted far more frequently than minority students.