Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "The Seattle Times" ...

  • Seattle Times: State Gives Driver's License Information to Immigration Authorities

    The Seattle Times revealed Washington state was regularly giving out personal driver’s-license information to immigration officers – just for the asking -- despite the governor’s vow not to cooperate with President Donald Trump’s enforcement agenda. The information was used by the federal government to arrest and deport people. The revelation led to major changes in how the state handles information.
  • Loaded with Lead: How gun ranges poison workers and shooters

    Roberto Sanchez suffered silently while racked with chronic pain. James Maddox quietly endured failing health. Manny Romo privately bore guilt for inadvertently exposing his children to an unseen peril. For decades, the stories of victims like these had gone untold until The Seattle Times’ “Loaded with Lead” series exposed a hidden danger pervading one of America’s most popular and growing pastimes. This series, the first of its kind, found that America’s gun ranges put workers, shooters and their family members at risk from an insidious poison: lead. “Loaded with Lead” laid bare how outdated industry safety standards, reckless shooting-range owners and lax regulation have contributed to hundreds of lead-poisoning cases nationwide. In an unprecedented analysis, our reporters discovered that regulators have only inspected 201 of America’s 6,000 commercial gun ranges, about 3 percent, in the past decade.
  • A Deadly Slope: Examining the Oso, Washington, disaster

    Two days after a landslide near Oso, Wash., killed 43 people, the county’s head of emergency management said the slide was unforeseeable: “This came out of nowhere. No warning.” The day after those words were spoken, The Seattle Times revealed how there had been a litany of warnings, going back seven decades. A report written for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had even warned of the “potential for a large catastrophic failure.” That story was the first in a string of exposés, in which The Times merged breaking news with investigative reporting to dissect the state’s worst natural disaster since the eruption of Mount St. Helens.
  • Race project: Racial disparities exist despite changing attitudes

    This small class in data and investigative journalism examined racial disparities over time as part of a collaborative effort between the University of Washington, The Seattle Times and The Pacific Science Center and their Race Project exhibit. Their findings delved into the problems with persistent disparities in race and ethnicity despite changing attitudes.
  • Pharma’s Windfall: The Mining of Rare Diseases

    In 1983, California congressman Henry Waxman helped pass the Orphan Drug Act to encourage research on rare diseases. The law offered financial incentives to drug makers in hopes they would tackle long-neglected disorders while breaking even or posting modest profits. Ever since, the Orphan Drug Act was lauded as government at its finest, praised for providing a boon in generating new pharmaceuticals. But by the act’s 30th anniversary, The Seattle Times found that the law’s good intentions had been subverted. In what amounts to a windfall, the pharmaceutical industry has exploited this once-obscure niche of the healthcare field, turning rare diseases into a multibillion dollar enterprise and the fastest-growing sector of America’s prescription-drug system. The series, “Pharma’s Windfall: The Mining of Rare Diseases,” uses extensive data from the FDA and NIH, along with financial reports from the SEC to show the financial incentives behind the system. For the human repercussions, the reporters found and told the stories of families struggling with rare disease.
  • Methadone and the Politics of Pain

    The Seattle Times has found that since 2003, at least 2,173 people in Washington have fatally overdosed on methadone, a narcotic that is both cheap and unpredictable. More so, Medicaid recipients account for about 8% of Washington's adult population but 48% of the methadone deaths.
  • "Inside the Collapse"

    Kerry Killinger, former CEO of Washington Mutual, refused to take blame for the bank's collapse. Instead, he cited the faltering housing market and "credit crisis." An investigation by The Seattle Times reveals Killinger and his employees used "reckless" and "predatory practices," like encouraging high-risk loans, to increase the bank's profits. The greed-fueled decisions eventually led to the bank's collapse.
  • The Favor Factory

    The Seattle Times analyzed the 2008 defense bill and found that lawmakers - who had promised full disclosure of earmarks - were hiding $3.5 billion of them, about 40 percent of total earmarks. Some of the most prominent and powerful members of Congress used loopholes in a new reform measure to avoid disclosure.
  • Suddenly Sick

    In this series, The Seattle Times revealed their findings from an investigation into the medical world. Among other things, they found that: "Pharmaceutical firms have commandeered the process by which diseases are defined." They reported that the World Health Organization and the U.S. Institutes of Health, among others, receive money from drug companies to promote the agendas of those companies. They also found that "some diseases have been radically redefined without a strong basis in medical evidence."
  • Head of Seattle's public-TV outlet to step down amid devastating debt

    The Seattle Times investigates the demise of KCTS and the resignation of its president, Burnill "Burnie" Clark. Although Clark claimed to resign because he was being targeted, The Seattle Times investigation found many employees and consultants who said Clark was the reason for the station's failure.