Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "U.S. Attorney General" ...

  • Death by Deadline

    In Death by Deadline, The Marshall Project’s Ken Armstrong reveals how a provision of a 1996 law intended to produce speedier executions has resulted in scores of condemned felons losing their chance for a federal appeal. Armstrong uncovered 80 cases where defense lawyers blew a filing deadline -- in most cases, costing their clients a chance to challenge the verdict or the sentence. The series brought a little-known issue to public attention and may lead to policy recommendations from the American Bar Association and outgoing U.S. attorney general, Eric Holder Jr.
  • The Truth About the Fast and Furious Scandal

    When Republicans, Democrats, and the media agree that a series of events occurred, it must be true, right? That was the situation Katherine Eban faced when she began investigating the Fast and Furious scandal. As portrayed by congressional Republicans and conceded by a Democratic U.S. attorney general, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives had allegedly adopted a disastrous policy of intentionally allowing weapons to be illegally trafficked to Mexican drug lords. Those allegations were the basis for a major congressional investigation and a national scandal. They ultimately led to the first instance in U.S. history in which a cabinet member, Attorney General Eric Holder, was deemed in contempt of Congress (because he refused to turn over documents relating to Fast and Furious). But Eban’s reporting in “The Truth About the Fast and Furious Scandal” showed that, in fact, the ATF never had a policy to permit gun trafficking. Yes, weapons made their way to Mexico, but it occurred because of lax laws and prosecutors who interpreted those laws so strictly as to make gun seizures almost impossible. To uncover the truth, Eban combed through 2,000 pages of confidential ATF documents and interviewed 39 people, including seven agents involved in the case. In six months of exhaustive investigation, Eban persuaded the ATF agents at the heart of the case—including the leader of the team at issue, who had never spoken to the press before—to give their accounts. She then crafted a riveting narrative that exposed the hypocrisy of the political maneuverings around the business of selling and using guns. Most important, the article explained exactly why our system fails to stop weapons from being trafficked. Befitting the charged subject, Fortune’s article provoked an unprecedented wave of response on its website, national media attention, considerable fury from gun advocates—the FBI investigated threats made to Eban after the article appeared—and angry objections from figures who came in for criticism in the story. Rep. Darrell Issa and Sen. Charles Grassley, both leading figures in the congressional investigation, devoted a 49-page appendix to a congressional report, with an additional 140 pages of allegedly supporting documents, to try to rebut the story. And an ostensible ATF whistleblower whose allegations were challenged by Eban’s reporting filed suit against Fortune’s publisher. In the end, the best stories—and the ones that contradict a universally held view—often stir up the most anger.
  • The Great Minnow Hunt

    "The FBI's 20-month investigation of corruption at the San Francisco Housing Authority seems to have netted one minnow as sharks swam free. Last summer, in what seems to herald the end of a federal investigation of the Housing Authority, a federal jury found a mid-level housing manager guilty of taking bribes to provide subsidized housing certificates to people who were ineligible to receive them. But transcripts of FBI interviews with the prosecution s chief witness, sworn depositions in a whistleblower lawsuit, exhibits in the housing manager's trial, and a HUD inspector general's reporter all suggest that high-ranking city officials and a longtime s associates of Mayor Willie Brown had knowledge of, or were involved in, the bribery conspiracy."