Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "U.S. military" ...

  • Families complain of mold, lead paint, rats in military housing ahead of hearing

    In February, CBS News gained access to privatized housing at Ft. Meade, becoming the first national television network to go on to a military base to investigate issues within the U.S. military’s privatized housing program. Through our coverage, CBS News exposed problems with mold, insects and structural integrity covered up or ignored by private housing companies. This story led to a swift response from then-Secretary of the Army Mark Esper, who granted an exclusive on-camera interview with CBS News to outline how his department planned to respond.
  • Pentagon secretly struck back against Iranian cyberspies targeting U.S. ships

    In the middle of June, tensions were rising between the United States and Iran. Iran had attacked oil tankers traveling through the Strait of Hormuz, and then downed an expensive, high-tech Navy RQ-4 Global Hawk surveillance drone flying over the Strait, upping the ante of the conflict. Given previous rhetoric from Trump administration officials including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo against the Iranian regime, the decision to exit the Iran deal or the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, and the increasingly heavy sanctions on Iran, the Yahoo News team was monitoring for chances to report in more depth on specific Iranian capabilities as well as U.S. plans to counter them. Following the attack on the U.S. drone, Yahoo News began communicating with sources who had extensive detail on a specific unit within the Iranian military in the cross-hairs of the U.S. military, a unit that had advanced its cyber capabilities to the point that it was able to track nearly all ships traveling through the Strait through both social engineering, or pretending to be attractive women engaging with service members traveling on the ships, to actually compromising ship GPS data websites in order to digitally monitor their paths. In the course of reporting, Yahoo News discovered a key, news breaking event—that just hours prior, the U.S. Cyber Command had launched a retaliatory strike aimed at limiting the capabilities of the specific Iranian cyber group the team had already been investigating. Yahoo was the first to break the news of the retaliatory strike, leading dozens of major news outlets to race to match the story. However, given the fact Yahoo News was investigating details into the cyber unit, our story was not only first but best and most detailed. The story demonstrates our ability to jump into the news cycle, provide key breaking news to our readers, as well as dig deep into illuminating new details. The story also revealed that Iranian capabilities to intercept and down drones to study them for espionage purposes was highly advanced, a fact previously unknown. Given President Trump’s recent decision to authorize a strike to kill IRGC Commander Qasem Suleimani, our reporting will continue to provide value to readers, analysts, and other interested parties hoping to better understand Iranian capabilities and how the U.S. might respond to them.
  • Newsweek: 2018 U.S. Military Southern Border Deployment

    An investigation into President Donald Trump's decision to deploy thousands of military troops to the southern border as a caravan of migrants travel to the U.S. in search of asylum.
  • Military.com: Aviators Kicked Out

    The U.S. military prides itself on its colorblind attitude to race and its increasing diversity. Why, then, does the field of naval aviation remain overwhelmingly white, and less diverse in some areas now than two decades ago? Three black aviators who share remarkably similar stories of getting expelled from the training pipeline say unconscious bias is to blame. These former trainees, some of whom remain in appeals with the Navy, say they're just as good as their white peers, and an instructor backs their assertions. Investigations, formal complaints, and a troubling aviation instructors' chat history paint a picture of an environment that dooms minority aviators from the moment they set foot on the flightline.
  • FRONTLINE / ProPublica: Documenting Hate

    FRONTLINE and ProPublica’s Documenting Hate collaboration — two hour-long documentaries and a raft of text stories — exposed some of the most violent figures within America’s resurgent white supremacist movement; the movement’s links to the U.S. military; and governmental failures to curb the criminal activities of dangerous white power groups.
  • 60 Minutes: War Crime

    60 MINUTES has obtained rare video of a 2017 sarin gas attack on Syrian civilians that drew a 59-missile response by the U.S. military last year. The disturbing high definition video, shown publically for the first time, exposes the horrors of these internationally banned weapons, that the Syrian Dictator Bashar al-Assad continues to use to massacre his own people.
  • WWII Secret Mustard Gas Testing

    This investigation uncovered new details about once-classified chemical weapons experiments conducted by the U.S. Military during World War II, in which African American, Puerto Rican and Japanese American troops were exposed to mustard gas to look for racial differences that could be exploited in battle. The series also revealed the Department of Veterans Affairs’ failure to compensate troops who were used in World War II chemical tests, despite promises made more than half a century earlier. http://www.npr.org/2015/06/22/415194765/u-s-troops-tested-by-race-in-secret-world-war-ii-chemical-experiments http://www.npr.org/2015/06/23/416408655/the-vas-broken-promise-to-thousands-of-vets-exposed-to-mustard-gas http://www.npr.org/series/417162462/world-war-ii-secret-mustard-gas-testing
  • The Drone Papers

    The Intercept obtained a cache of secret documents detailing the inner workings of the U.S. military’s assassination program in Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia. The documents, provided by a whistleblower within the intelligence community who worked on the drone program, offer an unprecedented glimpse into the U.S. military’s kill/capture operations during a key time in the evolution of the drone wars. After six months of reporting by a team of seven, The Intercept published The Drone Papers, a multimedia package of eight articles that revealed a deeply conflicted U.S. military and intelligence community secretly driving a program that kills far more people than the intended targets, causing serious harm to U.S. moral standing and national security. https://theintercept.com/drone-papers/
  • U.S. military personnel have been convicted of $50 million worth of crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan

    U.S. military personnel committed crimes worth more than $50 million during their deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan, capitalizing on the Defense Department’s decision to depend on cash transactions there without any genuine oversight, a Center for Public Integrity investigation found.
  • Nation Institute (TomDispatch and The Intercept) coverage of the U.S. Military in Africa

    I wrote an untitled collection of articles for The Nation Institute’s TomDispatch.com and First Look Media’s The Intercept investigating the U.S. military’s extensive and largely secret operations on the African continent. Utilizing documents obtained via the Freedom of Information Act and from a whistle blower as well as a plethora of open source material, I offered a rare glimpse of the actions of a very secretive military command. Along the way, I revealed covert U.S. drone bases used for targeted killing campaigns from Yemen and Somalia to Iraq and Syria; I exposed unreported drug use and criminal behavior by U.S. forces across Africa; and shined a light on a multitude of missions in which elite U.S. forces trained alongside members of African armies regularly cited by the State Department for human rights abuses; among many other revelations. (While The Intercept may not fit the definition of a small outlet, I generally work alone and receive only spare support beyond editing. And TomDispatch is a truly tiny outlet.) https://theintercept.com/drone-papers/target-africa/ https://theintercept.com/2015/10/21/stealth-expansion-of-secret-us-drone-base-in-africa/ https://theintercept.com/2016/02/10/where-to-invade-next-is-the-most-subversive-movie-michael-moore-has-ever-made/