Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Uganda" ...

  • Uganda’s international adoption scam

    Every year hundreds of U.S. citizens travel to Uganda to adopt children they deem to be orphans. Our investigation revealed that these children are often placed for adoption without proper due diligence.
  • Haves and Have-Nots: Uganda's drug-trial business is booming - but is it fair?

    Drug trials in developing nations around the world are growing exponentially. They are cheap. Rules are more lax. Uganda is one of the leading places in the world where this trend is taking place. In one of the world’s AIDS epicenters, in Gulu, northern Uganda, children are given a choice: be part of a drug trial involving risky treatment and at least get regular medications. Or rely on public health programs that often mean regularly missing required dosages of life-saving pharmaceuticals. The result is emblematic of a system where the ethics of drug trials face a grim reality. “The problem is that inadequate medical care creates a strong impetus for parents to agree to have their kids in research,” said Elizabeth Woeckner, president of Citizens for Responsible Care and Research, an organization that works to protect people who are the subjects of scientific research. “What should be voluntary is not quite so.” In the last five years, drug trials in Uganda have nearly doubled. There have been more than 100 trials in the last five years there. Drug companies such as Bristol Myers Squibb, Pfizer and Novartis, as well as American agencies, including the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute, work in places like Uganda because of the low cost and the number of patients who will sign up quickly for tests. At the same time, public funding for global health is diminishing. Despite safeguards, since the late 1990s a number of well-publicized cases have highlighted tests that appeared to violate ethical standards and regulations. While signing up for a trial is voluntary, that doesn’t make the decision easier – especially for parents who must decide what is best for their children, and knowing that the alternative means. This in-depth investigation goes beyond the surface to show the tough choices that arise from even the best intentioned drug trials, the vast sums of money at stake, and the seismic shift that has happened in the past decade for how the world tests drugs on humans.
  • Guns, Money and Cell Phones

    The Industry Standard reports that the demand for an ore called columbite-tantalite -- or coltan -- is helping to fuel the civil war in the Democratic Republic of Congo. When refined, coltan becomes tantalum, a highly heat-resistant metal powder that is a key component in everything from mobile phones to computer chips and VCR's. As the demand for these products has increased, "a new, more sinister market began flourishing in the ...Congo. There, warring groups - many funded and supplied by neighboring Rwanda and Uganda - are exploiting coltan mining to help finance a bloody civil war now in its third year." Although selling coltan is not illegal, a United Nations report in April suggested that thousands of tons of coltan had been smuggled from the Congo into Rwanda and Uganda, and may have eventually made it to the U.S. companies that use the material. For their part, these companies have no way of knowing whether the tantalum they use is helping to finance the civil war. Another side effect of the coltan trade: mining activity is especially big in the mountainous northeastern region of the Congo, where endangered gorillas live.
  • Forsaken

    An attempt to explain the fighting in Africa. The Republic of Congo, formerly Zaire, has seen little political stability since independence in Belgium, serving more as an "all-purpose African battleground" for different interests of Africa rather than a struggle by its people. Current Congo President Kabila came to power backed by an army from Rwanda and Uganda and 10 other African nations, largely as payback for former President Mobutu support of the Power Hutus (in Rwanda) which resulted in 1994 genocide of 800,000 Tutsis AND moderate Hutus. Mobutu's ties with Rwanda spawned resentment from Congo natives. The climate was right for Kabila to seize power. Yet in 1998, Kabila transfers his allegiance to his former enemies, the Power Hutus, and Rwanda retaliates and other nations join the fray.
  • (Untitled)

    Village Voice (New York) obtains documents showing the CIA allowed its agents to transport weapons, smuggle military equipment from the United States and engage in military operations for deposed Ugandan dictator Idi Amin during the mid-1970s, Dec. 23, 1986.