Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "United Nations" ...

  • The Lethal Legacy of Cluster Bombs

    This series of stories examined the political and human cost of Canada’s controversial approach towards ratifying the Convention on Cluster Munitions. It detailed how Canada had aligned itself with the United States, which has opted out of the CCM, and it explored the lethal legacy of U.S. cluster bomb use that is still being felt in Laos, four decades after the end of the of Vietnam War. This series broke news in the corridors of the United Nations in Geneva, including a rare on-the-record interview with a senior official with the scrupulously neutral International Committee of the Red Cross criticizing Canada’s position on the issue. These stories also reflected unprecedented access to the closed communist government of Laos, interviewing top officials who had never before talked to a Western journalist. This series gave voice to impoverished Laotian villagers who are threatened by these unexploded munitions, and they explained the larger economic and social implication of this lethal legacy of the long-ended Vietnam War. It also showed the U.S. influence over one of its closest allies in how it approached an important piece of foreign policy.
  • Haiti in a Time of Cholera

    Nearly 8,000 people have died horrible, painful deaths since a cholera epidemic swept through Haiti after a major earthquake in 2010. Over half a million others have been infected, and containment is nowhere in sight with dozens dying each week. A growing body of scientific evidence shows that United Nations peacekeepers brought the disease into the country.
  • Mauritania: Slavery's Last Stronghold

    Two CNN Digital reporters traveled to Mauritania -- a West African nation that became the last country in the world to abolish slavery – to document a practice the Mauritanian government denies still exists. Spending nearly a year to gain entry into the country and conducting many of their interviews at night and in covert locations, John Sutter and Edythe McNamee went to great lengths to uncover the tragedy of multigenerational servitude in Mauritania. They met people who’ve never known freedom; people who escaped slavery to find their lives hadn't changed; and abolitionists who have been fighting against slavery for years with minimal results. It was only five years ago -- in 2007 -- that the country finally passed a law that making slavery a crime. So far, only one slave owner has been convicted. The United Nations estimates 10% to 20% of Mauritanians live in slavery today. But the country continues to deny slavery’s existence and attempted to subvert Sutter’s and McNamee’s reporting by assigning to them a government “minder.” Nonetheless, the two succeeded at putting a face on a shocking practice that is similar to slavery in America before the Civil War, in which people are born into slavery and rarely escape. Their report – “Slavery’s Last Stronghold” -- featured a variety of mediums, including personal video accounts and written stories featuring firsthand accounts from freed slaves and one man’s transformative journey from slave owner to abolitionist. It also included related stories – such as the story of escaped Mauritanian slaves now living in Ohio. In response to the initiative, CNN iReport, the network’s global participatory news community, gathered messages of hope and support to be shared at a school for escaped slaves in Nouakchott, Mauritania.
  • "Carbonomics"

    The key elements lawmakers intend to use against global warming are "carbon offsets" of the "cap-and-trade" legislation. The investigation reveals these offsets have created a "loophole" and could potentially "undermine the entire effort to solve the climate crisis." The current United Nations-run program is "greatly flawed," and there are "scientific uncertainties" about the effectiveness of the "pollution reductions."
  • Sexual-Harassment Cases Plaque U.N.

    This investigation digs into how the United Nations (U.N.) handles internal sexual harassment complaints. The current system for handling complaints is arbitrary, unfair and delays bureaucracy. Many cases take years to judge, accusers either retire or resign, which leaves them out of reach of the U.N. justice system. Overall, “no matter which way the cases go, they mishandle it.”
  • Peace at what price?

    The authors investigated reports of abuse at the hands of the UN peacekeepers in Democratic Republic of Congo. A well known secret within the UN the rape and abuse of the community have left consequences far more damming than the remnants of war.
  • "Peace at What Price?"

    ABC news documented the extent of abuse U.N. peacekeepers have been inflicting on women and children in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Although reports of child pornography, rape and paedophile rings have been rampant, U.N. officials have refused to allow either military or civilian employees to be tried, and even have refused to cooperate with further investigation of its personnel.
  • Justice on the Grass

    Temple-Raston investigates the events leading to the genocide in Rwanda in 1994, and how Rwanda has fared in the aftermath. She details the United Nations' trial of three Rwandan journalists charged with inciting the murder of Tutsis. She follows their convictions for helping to start the RTLM hate radio station in Rwanda. She conveys how ordinary Rwandans felt during the three month-long genocide. She refers to her study as "the most notorious media trial since Nuremberg."
  • "Terrorism Investigations"

    This extensive 11-story investigation of terrorism in the U.S. deals a spectrum of issues ranging from suspected terrorists who were granted U.S. citizenship to links formed between Al Qaeda and Saudi Arabia. The first story in the series looks at how easy it is for suspected terrorists to gain U.S. citizenship due to "bureaucratic incompetence and turf wars." The next story looks at how some have slipped under the radar of the U.S. and United Nations' effort to freeze terrorists' funds. Another story investigates Gen. William "Jerry" Boykin, head of a Pentagon unit hunting for Osama Bin Laden, as he makes derogatory statements about Islam in U.S. churches. NBC News also looks at "how war in Iraq drained resources from the hunt for Bin Laden."
  • Children of War: Fighting, Dying, Surviving

    Millions of Children around the globe are fighting, dying, and surviving war. The United Nations Children's Fund estimates that in the past 20 years, children younger than 16 have fought in at least 16 wars in 25 countries.