Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Virgin Islands" ...

  • Serbian Government Assets Revealed

    KRIK decided to focus on revealing corruption and crime at the highest levels of power. In late 2015 our team of journalists started to expose the hidden assets of Serbian politicians, as well as their relationship networks and potential wrongdoing. Our first discovery in this field was that Sinisa Mali, the Mayor of Belgrade, has secretly bought 24 resort apartments on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast through offshore companies from British Virgin Islands. This story has attracted huge attention from the Serbian public and it was picked up in all Serbian media. That inspired us to continue to investigate the mayor’s business deals in 2016 but also expand our investigation on other political elites. This one year investigation resulted in publishing a complete database of assets and businesses of all ministers from the new Serbian government in December 2016. https://imovinapoliticara.krik.rs/display/
  • The battle for V.I. Senate spending records

    The Virgin Islands Daily News battled the Virgin Islands Senate via FOI requests, numerous stories and editorials, and we finally had to file a lawsuit against the legislative body – at a cost of more than $20,000 to our under-10,000 circulation newspaper – before winning access to thousands of records of the senators' spending. As a result, several senators chose not to run for reelection, several were not reelected and the rest have made loud and public pledges of total transparency. The newspaper's scrutiny and reporting on the misuse of public money – as revealed in the documents we obtained – is ongoing.
  • License to Seal

    The Virgin Islands Daily News’ investigative report “License to Steal” blew the whistle on the V.I. government’s lax oversight, loose laws and wide loopholes that were an open invitation to rip off Virgin Islands residents. The newspaper’s two-month investigation not only tracked a con man’s many identities and unearthed his record of financial fraud, it also turned a spotlight on what the V.I. government did and did not do to protect residents from schemes like this one, a bogus credit union. The same day we published the report, the V.I. government announced that it would respond with a two-pronged regulatory and prosecutorial approach aimed at closing the loopholes and assisting the bogus credit union’s depositors.
  • Our Money, Their Failures

    A six-week investigation by The Virgin Islands Daily News into the people and the money connected to the U.S. Virgin Islands governor's proposal for a $55 million sports complex. The investigative report was published on one day across 11 pages and achieved the result of stopping the project and forcing the governor to pledge no further contracts without vetting the principals. In the case of the sports complex that the governor and some V.I. senators were trying to push through, the investigation uncovered misrepresentations and a string of financial failures by a number of the private parties in the deal with the governor.
  • Our Money, Their Failures

    A six-week investigation by The Virgin Islands Daily News into the people and the money connected to the U.S. Virgin Islands governor's proposal for a $55 million sports complex. The investigative report was published on one day across 11 pages and achieved the result of stopping the project and forcing the governor to pledge no further contracts without vetting the principals. In the case of the sports complex that the governor and some V.I. senators were trying to push through, the investigation uncovered misrepresentations and a string of financial failures by a number of the private parties in the deal with the governor.
  • "Welfare Waste"

    Welfare funds can be, and often are, misused. A review of "two million state welfare transactions" by the KSTP-TV team reveals that EBT cards were used more than 100 times in liquor stores during the course of one month. They also found the money was spent on things like lottery tickets and tattoos, and the practice is entirely legal.
  • Hospital Corruption: "Salaries First, Patients Last"; "Hospital Secrets"

    The series exposed Schneider Regional Medical Center's top executives' self-dealing and lavish pay, perks and the tragic result: The public hospital's cancer center was left so cash-strapped it could not pay for medicine and radiation equipment. The Daily News also revealed that more than $2.4 million in charity donations to the hospital's cancer center is missing, and the hospital cannot produce documentation to explain the numerous large withdrawals from bank accounts and entities that were specifically created to receive those donations. The investigation also found that two top hospital executives had criminal records, which were not disclosed when they were hired.
  • Diploma Mill

    A series of stories from the Virgin Islands Daily News, "Diploma Mill" reveals that the V.I. government was working with and enabling a diploma mill to target V.I. teachers. The author's research indicates that the institution was not a school, but was instead a "diploma-generating business that had ties to a questionable online operation."
  • Deadly Force

    This story investigates the Virgin Islands police force and their chronic misuse of deadly force. No officers were ever disciplined or held responsible for their actions. The police department had training problems, illegal and outdated policy, financial constraints and a shortage of personnel. The article not only illuminated these problems, but offered a variety of solutions.
  • Cheating Our Children: How Education Officials Hide Their Failures

    The Virgin Islands Daily News' five-month investigation examines the failure of education officials and the Education Department to adequately prepare public school students for jobs and college. (Dec. 12-18, 1996)