Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism" ...

  • Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism: Undemocratic

    An investigative reporting class at the University of Wisconsin-Madison investigated the state of Wisconsin's democracy. It found that partisan gerrymandering, voter restrictions, secret campaign money, furtive legislative moves and fast-tracking of bills increasingly leave Wisconsin's citizens in the dark when it comes to state policy making and spending.
  • Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism: Countering Concussions

    Our series, "Countering Concussions," revealed that while the University of Wisconsin-Madison is a leader in studying concussions, some former football players are suffering from severe post-concussive symptoms that have prompted them to leave the game — and worry about their futures.
  • Cruel and Unusual?

    In a five-month investigation, “Cruel and Unusual?,” the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism’s Bill Lueders identified 40 alleged instances of physical or severe psychological abuse by guards at one state prison, Waupun Correctional Institution. All of the incidents allegedly involved prisoners in the so-called segregation unit. Two-thirds of them involved a single correctional officer.
  • Emergency text alert system inconsistent across college campuses

    In the wake of violence across college campuses in recent years, the wide range of percentages of college students who receive emergency notifications via text message reflect the inconsistent and patchwork emergency notification systems that U.S. universities and colleges use. In addition, universities vary on how they keep track of who and how many receive these alerts. But a review of university procedures at about two-dozen universities by Midwest student reporters revealed that universities automatically send out emergency notifications to school email addresses, but often allow students to opt-in for text messages. In fact, many schools do not require students to register for and receive text messages.
  • Water Watch Wisconsin

    Water Watch Wisconsin, a joint project of the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, Wisconsin Public Radio and Wisconsin Public Television, is examining the quality and supply of Wisconsin’s water, which is increasingly subjected to human and climatic influences. A guiding question, throughout the project: Is this trend sustainable? Water is one of Wisconsin’s greatest treasures. The state is home to about 15,000 lakes, has more miles of Great Lakes coastline than any state except Michigan, and has underground reserves in four major aquifers.
  • Lost signals; disconnected lives

    While reporting this project, thirteen offenders told the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism that the state’s GPS tracking system repeatedly failed, registered false alerts that landed them in jail when they hadn’t done anything wrong.
  • Rural slide

    In this three-day series, the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism (WCIJ) explored rural population losses in three Wisconsin counties — and potential statewide solutions.
  • Supreme Court Spat

    This story, produced by the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism and Wisconsin Public Radio, was first to report on a June 13 altercation in which Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice David Prosser placed his hands on the neck of fellow Justice Ann Walsh Bradley in a dispute in her office in front of other members of the court. The article reported that the argument concerned the timing of the court's release of a decision upholding Republican Gov. Scott Walker's controversial bill to curb the collective bargaining rights of the state's public employees, and that the Capitol Police Department and the Wisconsin Judicial Commission were informed of the incident. The story also revealed that the Capitol police chief had come in to speak to the court's seven members about it. Although the initial story relied on anonymous sources, all of the facts were subsequently confirmed by on-the-record interviews, and later by police reports.