Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "atomic weapon" ...

  • Assault on Pelindaba

    "Assault on Pelindaba is a story about global nuclear weapons proliferation and the very real threat of nuclear terrorism post 9/11. Experts agree that acquiring plutonium or highly enriched uranium, the material to actually make a nuclear weapon, is not easy."
  • What the atomic age left behind

    This series described a 10.5-million-ton pile of nuclear waste polluting the Colorado River. The waste was left over from decades of milling uranium ore, first for atomic weapons and later for nuclear fuel. For decades, the pile of toxic and radioactive waste leaked into the river, which provides the drinking water for more than 20 million people in three western states. It was the largest of the dozens of piles of tailings and the only one that hadn't been moved away from major rivers in the United States. And for a while, it appeared it would stay put, contaminating the river for centuries.
  • News zero: The New York Times and the bomb

    This book documents how The New York Times shaped public opinions that helped the U.S. government develop atomic weaponry. The book reveals how The Times' science writer also was on the payroll of the U.S. Army, how The Times obscured the impact of radiation, and how the enormity of U.S. nuclear weapons tests in the Pacific has been shrouded in secrecy for decades despite an amount of testing from 1946 to 1962 that equates to the detonation of about 8,580 Hiroshima-sized bombs.
  • (Untitled)

    In May 1943, the Japanese fleet at the Pacific island of Truk was chosen as the first preliminary target of the U.S. atom bombs, which were expected to be ready by spring of 1945. Military planners ruled out Germany as a target, fearing that if the bomb was a dud the Germans would use it to design their own atomic weapons. The scientists who worked on the bomb believed Germany was the target until well into 1945. Some scientists left the Manhattan Project after learning that the Germans did not have a viable atomic bomb program. (May/June 1995)