Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "attorney general" ...

  • Inside Texas' botched voter-rolls review

    The press release landed late on a Friday afternoon: State officials had found 95,000 “noncitizens” on the Texas voter rolls — and 58,000 of those people had voted. The reaction from GOP state leaders, who have long pushed unsubstantiated claims of rampant voter fraud in Texas, was swift and certain. “VOTER FRAUD ALERT,” Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton tweeted. “Thanks to Attorney General Paxton and the Secretary of State for uncovering and investigating this illegal vote registration,” Gov. Greg Abbott tweeted, adding, “I support prosecution where appropriate.” Even President Donald Trump chimed in. “58,000 non-citizens voted in Texas, with 95,000 non-citizens registered to vote. These numbers are just the tip of the iceberg.” The state’s claims immediately raised red flags for our voting rights reporter, Alexa Ura. Ura knew the state had used driver’s license records — where applicants must reveal their citizenship status — to cross-reference the voter rolls and flag potential illegitimate voters. She also knew that in Texas, immigrants only have to renew their driver’s license every few years — meaning many thousands of people flagged by the state’s review had almost certainly become naturalized citizens before they registered and voted. Her breaking news story on state leaders’ “voter fraud” announcement explained those flawed methods and cast serious doubts on their claims. But her follow-up reporting — dozens of explanatory and investigative stories over as many weeks — had far greater impact than merely debunking irresponsible claims.
  • WUFT: Cost of Sunshine

    Public record requests of various county and local governments were made in an effort to determine the number of public record requests received by each governmental unit, the cost to provide access to the requested records, the fees recovered from requestors, and copies of agency public record access policies. Those governmental units not audited received a survey designed to obtain the same information sought in the public record requests. Public record requests included all county constitutional officers in nine Florida counties as well as the city clerk in the county seat. County constitutional officers include the state attorney; sheriff; clerk of court; tax collector; property appraiser; supervisor of elections; public defender; and school superintendent. Counties were chosen based on geographic and population diversity. Six state agencies were also included: Executive Office of Governor, Attorney General,Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Department of Financial Services, Department of Juvenile Justice, Department of Veteran’s Affairs.
  • WSAW-TV: The Lincoln Hills Youth Prison Document Trail

    Using state and federal records requests, WSAW-TV's senior investigative reporter found a potential cover-up of Gov. Scott Walker and Attorney General Brad Schimel's and their staff's handling of the state's youth prison crisis.
  • WCPO: DNA Delay

    A tip from a rape victim leads WCPO Investigative Reporter Hillary Lake to uncover a DNA testing delay at the Kentucky State Crime Lab affecting thousands of new criminal cases, from assaults to rapes to murders, waiting on results to move forward in the justice system. The investigation leads to action from the Kentucky attorney general.
  • Still Failing the Frail

    "Still Failing the Frail" is a follow-up to PennLive’s 2016 IRE-award winning series, "Failing the Frail." That six-part series explored major problems in Pennsylvania’s nursing home industry, spurred in part by the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s 2015 lawsuit against Golden Living. In 2018, the lead reporter of that series, Daniel Simmons-Ritchie, wanted to determine what, if any, progress had been made in Pennsylvania’s nursing home sector since the 2015 lawsuit and PennLive’s 2016 series.
  • ProJo: Suffering in the Shadows: Elder abuse in Rhode Island

    Rhode Island has one of the nation’s highest elderly populations, and a special unit in the state Attorney General’s office dedicated to prosecuting elder abuse. But over 17 years, fewer than half of those charged were convicted of this felony, and only 13 percent served any prison time. The reasons are many, the solutions a challenge -- but there are jurisdictions that do this better.
  • Alabama Media Group: Dirty Business

    In 2017, federal prosecutors charged Balch & Bingham lawyer Joel Gilbert and Drummond vice president David Roberson with bribing state Rep. Oliver Robinson to help them fight the EPA. However, as Whitmire revealed, their astroturfing scheme went much further, involving public officials from a school superintendent to U.S. senators. When Whitmire requested records from the Alabama Attorney General's Office showing Luther Strange's role in the scheme, the office denied those records existed. Whitmire proved, not once but twice, that officials there were lying, and that Strange had put his name on Gilbert's work product to persuade the EPA not to help poor residents in north Birmingham clean their soil of toxins. Further, Whitmire showed a small local school district had agreed to help resist the EPA, too, denying EPA access to test schoolyards for toxins.
  • "Predator Priests" Grand Jury Report

    In August 2018, Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro released a grand jury report outlining the alleged abuse of hundreds of children at the hands of priests in several Roman Catholic Dioceses across Pennsylvania. Investigative reporter Paul Van Osdol began immediately sifting through the report to find out where the men outlined in the report were today and what they were doing. The most shocking case he uncovered was that of an accused priest from the Pittsburgh Catholic Diocese who was a practicing counselor just across the state line in Ohio.
  • Swiss Leaks: Murky Cash Sheltered By Bank Secrecy

    “Swiss Leaks: Murky Cash Sheltered By Bank Secrecy” is a penetrating multi-part investigation into the darker side of the world’s second largest bank that prompted questions about the appointment of the United States attorney general, a diplomatic crisis for Switzerland, official inquiries and debate on four continents including a British parliamentary inquiry, and criminal charges and civil lawsuits in multiple countries.
  • Two linked scandals: An embattled attorney general and a besieged Supreme Court

    In a series of investigative articles, The Philadelphia Inquirer raised major questions about the performance of Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane. At the same time, the paper probed a related scandal involving misconduct at the state Supreme Court, whose justices Kane accused of swapping offensive emails on state computers—messages laden with pornography and misogynistic, homophobic and racist jokes. Unlike most entries in this contest, the newspaper’s work on this investigation has played out over more than a year in a saga that has gathered more and more momentum.