Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "black market" ...

  • Rocky Mountain PBS: Cultivating Crime

    “Cultivating Crime” took a deep dive into the underground world of illegal marijuana in Colorado. Coloradans thought legalizing marijuana would destroy the black market, but our investigation found it did the opposite. We revealed how law enforcement says Colorado is now a magnet for organized crime with international ties. Our investigation found that criminal prosecutions linked to the cultivation, conspiracy, and possession with intent to distribute of large amounts of marijuana increased dramatically after Colorado voters legalized the drug. Law enforcement officials said Colorado’s laws allowing home cultivation of marijuana opened the door for criminal organizations to move in from other parts of the world to grow large amounts of plants, under the cover of legalization, for sale in other states at much higher prices.
  • Black Market Babies

    The series investigated illicit adoptions of babies born to mothers from the Marshall Islands.
  • The Traffickers: The Girl in the Window

    The Traffickers is an investigative documentary series which traces the global trafficking routes of some of the world’s most sought after commodities: Gold, exotic animals, sex, even human body parts - anything can be bought for a price. The aim was ambitious - to give an exclusive guide to the global black market world, with high production values, excellent cinematography, dynamic story-telling and outstanding journalism. The series is presented by Nelufar Hedayat, who herself was trafficked as a child refugee from war-torn Afghanistan. During the course of filming, Nelufar visited 22 different countries, criss-crossing the world to follow the story. The Dark Side of Adoption reveals how American couples adopting babies from the DRC can be caught up in an adoption scam which hoodwinks unsuspecting parents into giving up their children.
  • Profiting from Hunger

    Venezuela’s president handed the military complete control of the food supply last year after people took to the streets to protest severe shortages. But far from fighting hunger in the crisis-wracked country, the AP investigation found evidence of the military making millions from it through kickbacks and the sale of staples on the black market at dozens of times the government-set prices.
  • CBS News: BLACK MARKET SYRIAN ANTIQUITIES

    In a six-month investigation, Clarissa Ward and investigative producer Jennifer Janisch penetrated the secretive black market trade of antiquities from Syria and Iraq, using hidden cameras to capture the first evidence of an authentic Roman mosaic stolen out of Syria, potentially worth six figures. https://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/151447016/ebc8378177
  • Nuclear Black Market Seeks IS Extremists

    The AP investigation found that a remote corner of Eastern Europe has become a thriving marketplace for nuclear material aimed at extremists in the Middle East. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBCi3lyftvo
  • Inside the Global Black Market for Stolen iPhones

    Gerry Smith's four-part Huffington Post series exploring the global underground trade in stolen smartphones.
  • Invasion of Privacy

    The report showed the extension to which confidential information of Brazilians is unprotected. It showed sales of passwords for the access to the police database, trade of confidential information from the IRS, and negotiations involving private telephone information. Pretending to be another person, the reporter was able to buy even his own private telephone information on the black market, including all the calls he had made and received within 30 days.
  • Medical Marijuana

    Loose restrictions in state law and scant oversight by regulators have allowed people to hijack Oregon’s medical marijuana program for purposes voters never intended, The Oregonian’s investigation revealed. Most patients are using the drug to treat chronic pain rather than terminal illness, far more marijuana is grown than patients consume, and traffickers ship the excess out of state for profit. At the heart of the yearlong investigation was a wide range of public records. First there were written documents: court records and police reports on medical marijuana growers; disciplinary actions against doctors who admit patients to the state program; internal policy manuals; and correspondence between regulators and doctors. Then there were electronic data. Through months of negotiations, the paper persuaded state health authorities to release a database of participants in the marijuana program that protected patient confidentiality. A separate database on Oregon State Police traffic stops helped us to demonstrate the widespread diversion of medical marijuana to the black market. Among the investigation’s original results, published as an occasional series: Communities in southern Oregon have concentrations of marijuana patients 10 times the statewide average; Police patrolling Oregon’s highways now seize more West Coast medical marijuana than pot grown outside the program; The state places few limitations on felons participating in the program, and dozens of trafficking prosecutions involve medical marijuana cardholders with existing criminal histories; Fifty-two children are legally permitted to use pot under the state program, with limited input from pediatricians or specialists treating their underlying illnesses; Nine doctors signed off on more than half the patients in the program, and 75 percent of patients used doctors with improbably high caseloads.
  • Crime and Human Organs

    Bloomberg Markets magazine shows how impoverished people from Belarus to Nicaragua have been humiliated, maimed, and killed by organ traffickers and the doctors with whom they work. The stories expose the activities of transplant rings that supply wealthy Americans, Europeans, and Israelis with kidneys extracted from the poor.