Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "bombs" ...

  • Bombs In Your Backyard: Investigating One of America’s Greatest Polluters

    The military might of the United States has come at an extraordinary environmental price. The nation’s defense technologies and armaments have been developed, tested, stored, decommissioned and disposed of on vast tracts of American soil, where they have polluted fields and rivers, contaminated drinking water and put legions of people’s health at risk. For the first time, this project examined the full extent of the damage — 39,000 sites adding up to an area larger than the state of Florida, affecting millions of people. Our stories exposed the Pentagon’s routine practice of open burning of hazardous waste; its reliance on incompetent or fraudulent contractors that dump waste or fake cleanups; its four-decade campaign to make a dangerous and pervasive chemical explosive appear safe and avoid regulation; and its explicit refusal to comply with federal environmental laws even when the exposure of young children to lead poisoning from munition was at stake. We gained exclusive access to the Pentagon’s complete environmental dataset, and created a news application which for the first time mapped searchable data about contaminated sites across U.S. territories.
  • Bombs In Your Backyard

    The military might of the United States has come at an extraordinary environmental price. The nation’s defense technologies and armaments have been developed, tested, stored, decommissioned and disposed of on vast tracts of American soil, where they have polluted fields and rivers, contaminated drinking water and put legions of people’s health at risk. For the first time, this project examined the full extent of the damage — 39,000 sites adding up to an area larger than the state of Florida, affecting millions of people. Our stories exposed the Pentagon’s routine practice of open burning of hazardous waste; its reliance on incompetent or fraudulent contractors that dump waste or fake cleanups; its four-decade campaign to make a dangerous and pervasive chemical explosive appear safe and avoid regulation; and its explicit refusal to comply with federal environmental laws even when the exposure of young children to lead poisoning from munition was at stake. We gained exclusive access to the Pentagon’s complete environmental dataset, and created a news application which for the first time mapped searchable data about contaminated sites across U.S. territories.
  • SWEDISH RADIO: The bombings, the Security Service and the Nazis

    In November 2016 and January 2017, three bombings are perpetrated in the Swedish city of Gothenburg. The attacks target newly arrived refugees and left-wing activists. One cleaner at a refugee centre is critically injured. The Security Service quickly identifies three local Nazis as those responsible. Later, when they are sentenced by the District Court, the investigation is introduced as a huge success. But when Swedish Radio starts looking into the police investigation, it turns out that the Security Service has had several opportunities to stop the bombings, that they had taken considerable risks in securing evidence, and that one of the bombs were planted right under the noses of the Security Service agents, without them intervening. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism.
  • Nuclear Risks

    The Obama administration has waged an international campaign to lock down nuclear explosive materials over the past seven years, to stem the risk that a terrorist might detonate a bomb in New York, Washington, or elsewhere. But three countries in particular have proved immune to U.S. pressures for better safeguards: South Africa, Russia, and India. Our deep investigations into their nuclear activities laid bare a toxic mix of ineptitude, nationalism, and greed – and not just in foreign capitals – that keeps the world at risk.
  • How your 401k profits from bombing Yemen

    An exclusive investigation series tracking shipments of weapons exported by Italy to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates since the bombing campaign on Yemen began in March 2015. The investigation found verifiable evidence of the Italian-manufactured bombs on the ground in Yemen, and showed how readers may be profiting from the sales of these weapons through sovereign and institutional funds.
  • Secret Casualties

    While American troops in Iraq never found an active weapons-of-mass-destruction program, they instead found — and greatly suffered from — long-abandoned chemical weapons. Nearly 5,000 old chemical warheads, shells or aviation bombs had been recovered; dozens of Americans and Iraqis were wounded by them. Yet, year after year, the Pentagon covered it up. Congress was misled, medical care was denied and soldiers were refused the honors and recognition they deserved for battlefield injuries.
  • Terror in Boston

    When terror struck at the Boston marathon, ABC News Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Team raced to the scene and stayed for weeks, uncovering exclusive details and providing round-the-clock coverage surrounding the plot that tragically took the lives of three innocent people and brought the city of Boston to a standstill for five days. In a series of 17 stories in the week following the explosions, and a total of 35 aired television investigative reports in the month afterwards, Ross and his team reported on every ABC News platform and breaking news report. The team was the first to report that pressure cookers and components of toy remote control cars were used to construct the bombs, intimate details about what bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev wrote right before he was captured, and new leads in the investigation, including a photo of the suspects taken inside a Lord & Taylor department store. Throughout this coverage, the ABC News Investigative Team worked diligently to fact check every detail in this fast-moving investigation. While other news organizations chose to air photos of two potential suspects early on that would then prove not to be correct or in any way connected to the bombing, ABC News chose accuracy over speed, fact-checking over error, resulting in coverage that broke numerous headlines and provided ABC News viewers and readers with up-to-the-moment details and exclusive investigative insight.
  • Brian Ross Investigates: Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.
  • The Lethal Legacy of Cluster Bombs

    This series of stories examined the political and human cost of Canada’s controversial approach towards ratifying the Convention on Cluster Munitions. It detailed how Canada had aligned itself with the United States, which has opted out of the CCM, and it explored the lethal legacy of U.S. cluster bomb use that is still being felt in Laos, four decades after the end of the of Vietnam War. This series broke news in the corridors of the United Nations in Geneva, including a rare on-the-record interview with a senior official with the scrupulously neutral International Committee of the Red Cross criticizing Canada’s position on the issue. These stories also reflected unprecedented access to the closed communist government of Laos, interviewing top officials who had never before talked to a Western journalist. This series gave voice to impoverished Laotian villagers who are threatened by these unexploded munitions, and they explained the larger economic and social implication of this lethal legacy of the long-ended Vietnam War. It also showed the U.S. influence over one of its closest allies in how it approached an important piece of foreign policy.
  • Eternal Harvest: The Legacy of American Bombs in Laos

    Between 1964 and 1973, in an offshoot of the Vietnam War, the U.S. military dropped 4 billion pounds of explosives on Laos. Up to 30 percent of those bombs did not detonate, and they remain in the Laotian soil today as UXO—unexploded ordnance—contaminating more than one-third of surface area of the country. Tens of thousands of civilians have been killed and injured in UXO accidents since the war officially ended. 2014 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the start of that bombing campaign. Yet every week, more Laotians are hurt and killed. In a rural country largely composed of subsistence farmers, it is dangerous to dig. Coates and Redfern spent more than seven years traveling in Laos, talking to farmers, scrap-metal hunters, people who make and use tools from UXO, and the bomb-disposal teams working to render the land harmless. With their words and photographs, they reveal the beauty of Laos, the strength of Laotians, and the daunting scope of the problem - a problem largely unknown outside the country. Much of the American bombing campaign was carried out in secret, known only to pilots, policy makers and the people on the ground under the flight paths. Coates and Redfern aim to educate readers—especially Americans—about this little-known war and its lesser-known legacy, at a time when Americans are learning about their government's recent efforts to operate in secrecy. Eternal Harvest offers a critical look at the effects on civilians of secret military actions.