Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "business" ...

  • BuzzFeed News: Trump’s Money Trail

    An investigation, anchored by exclusive documents, into the business holdings and secret financial dealings of President Donald Trump and his associates.
  • Boston Globe: Lawrence Gas Explosions

    After the Merrimack Valley region of Massachusetts was rocked on Sept. 13, 2018, by natural gas explosions that killed one young man, displaced thousands of residents, and cut off heat and power to homes and businesses for three months, the Boston Globe responded with dozens of daily stories as well as a steady stream of investigative pieces, attempting to tell readers exactly what had happened and why -- and whether the officials working to set things right were up to the task. Here are five early examples of investigative work connected to the disaster.
  • The Innocents: How U.S. Immigration Policy Punishes Migrant Children

    Federal immigration policies that separated children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border had real, traumatic consequences on the most vulnerable members of our society. This series of exclusive investigations identified “tender age shelters” warehousing babies and toddlers, exposed a Virginia shelter where migrant teenagers described horrific abuse and followed a Salvadoran mother who came close to losing her daughter to adoption, revealing the legal possibility that separated children could be permanently taken from their parents. AP also followed the money, highlighting the billion-dollar business in migrant child detention, a sector that has grown tenfold in the last decade. Just before year’s end, AP broke the news that the government was keeping most of the 14,000 migrant kids in its care in shelters with hundreds of others, despite expert warnings that mass institutionalization can cause life-long trauma. Based on deep source reporting and exclusive data, the story was the first to provide the number of children in every government-contracted detention center, shelter and foster care program dating back to 2017 - data the government had been withholding all year.
  • Alabama Media Group: Dirty Business

    In 2017, federal prosecutors charged Balch & Bingham lawyer Joel Gilbert and Drummond vice president David Roberson with bribing state Rep. Oliver Robinson to help them fight the EPA. However, as Whitmire revealed, their astroturfing scheme went much further, involving public officials from a school superintendent to U.S. senators. When Whitmire requested records from the Alabama Attorney General's Office showing Luther Strange's role in the scheme, the office denied those records existed. Whitmire proved, not once but twice, that officials there were lying, and that Strange had put his name on Gilbert's work product to persuade the EPA not to help poor residents in north Birmingham clean their soil of toxins. Further, Whitmire showed a small local school district had agreed to help resist the EPA, too, denying EPA access to test schoolyards for toxins.
  • Trump, Inc.

    Trump, Inc. is an open investigation by WNYC and ProPublica that has brought together listeners, readers, and many journalists to answer basic, vital questions about Trump the president, Trump the businessman, and the blurry lines between the two.
  • The Girl From Kathmandu: Twelve Dead Men and a Woman's Quest for Justice

    A nonfiction narrative of Iraq war profiteering, human trafficking, and the battle to defend human rights in U.S. courts. "A powerful work of investigative journalism, one that speaks volumes about the business of war and of human slavery alike.” -- Kirkus Reviews.
  • Fatal Flaws

    Kentucky's worker safety program failed to properly investigate nearly every on-the-job death for two years. The victims were tree trimmers, public-works employees, construction workers, home health aides. They died in jobs everyone knows to be dangerous and in jobs you might attend every day without considering whether you'd make it home. But in almost every case, the state's Occupational Safety and Health program didn't do enough to determine if a business was responsible for unsafe conditions — never mind actually hold them accountable.
  • Pennsylvania Turnpike investigation

    WTAE TV revealed waste, mismanagement and conflicts of interest at the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Emails showed turnpike officials congratulating themselves for their response to a storm that left more than 500 drivers stranded for more than 20 hours. Records revealed turnpike commissioners getting take-home cars even though they meet only once a month. Documents showed a turnpike commissioner cutting personal business deals with turnpike vendors. All this occurred as the turnpike hiked tolls and cut back on projects to deal with a financial crisis.
  • US Tax Havens: The new Switzerland

    Financial Times' Investigations Correspondent Kara Scannell was the first to uncover first hand accounts of how businesses exploit complex trust laws in South Dakota. Her findings, published as "US Tax Havens: The new Switzerland" uncovered a thriving onshore tax haven business. Scannell's shoe-leather reporting gave her unprecedented access to first person sources, including exclusive access to elusive business figures within the shadowy practice. Together with Vanessa Houlder, Scannell's trust law research emboldened a lively, revelatory report that contributed to the ongoing and serious debate over the use and abuse of domestic tax havens.
  • 'Not Wanted': Racial Bias at Trump Properties

    In the weeks leading up to the presidential election, the NBC News Investigative Unit and MSNBC broadcast an in-depth report on the Trump family business’s racist practices in the 1960's through the early 1980's, when African-Americans seeking to rent apartments in New York City were turned away because of the color of their skin.