Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "campus safety" ...

  • Student threatened professor more than a year before killing him

    This USC Annenberg Media special investigation uncovered that despite receiving a written warning that a student intended to kill his professor, USC administrators allowed him back on campus to work with the man he threatened and would go on to stab to death on campus. This story revealed that USC did not have a system in place to adequately track threats to campus safety and make sure students with serious mental illness were well enough to be in school.
  • Clery Act Challenges -- Many schools continue to struggle with law or fail to follow guidelines

    This story focused broadly on university compliance with the Clery Act, a federal campus safety law first enacted in the aftermath of a Lehigh University student's murder more than 25 years ago. While schools are expected to be diligent in disclosing campus crime statistics, many institutions do not devote significant manpower to overseeing Clery Act compliance and the intricacies of the law can be a source of confusion.
  • The Arming Question

    Princeton Public Safety officers are sworn police officers who have the same training and enforce the same laws as local police officers, and they are responsible for responding to the same incidents -- including armed incidents -- as local officers. Yet University Public Safety officers are forbidden from carrying guns. Despite the Virginia Tech shootings and three gun scares on Princeton's campus in recent years, the University has been steadfast in its opposition to arming its officers. But our investigation casts doubt on the University's conclusion that keeping officers unarmed will not affect the response to a shooter on campus and that arming would negatively impact student-officer relationships.