Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "cell phone" ...

  • Unchecked Power

    After losing hard-fought reelection campaigns, Alabama’s sheriffs often turn their attention to undermining their successors in ways that abuse the public trust. On his way out the door, one sheriff drilled holes in government-issued cell phones, while another pocketed public money intended to feed inmates. The ousted leaders dumped jail food down the drain and burned through tens of thousands of sheriff's office dollars by purchasing thousands of rolls of toilet paper. These are among the findings of my six-month investigation into these practices for AL.com and the ProPublica Local Reporting Network. In June 2019, I chronicled the actions of nine defeated Alabama sheriffs, seven of whom allegedly destroyed public property, stole public funds and/or wasted taxpayer money after their electoral defeats. These stories were made possible by my realization that incoming sheriffs were often more willing to talk on the record about the bad behavior and criminality of predecessors who had taken advantage of them than they would be under other circumstances.
  • WRAL: Police and Google

    WRAL investigation finds that Raleigh police have been using Google to find suspects in crimes. They are not gathering information on specific individuals; they are using warrants to obtain information on every Google-equipped cell phone that was within a mile or two of a crime scene. The users have no way to know that their movements are being reviewed by police.
  • KCUR Investigates: Ryan Stokes Was Killed By A Kansas City Cop. His Family Wants Police To Tell The Truth

    Ryan Stokes' name isn't mentioned in the same breath as Trayvon Martin or Michael Brown, but it should be. Stokes, a 24-year-old black man in Kansas City, was killed by a police officer after he was wrongfully accused of stealing a white man's cell phone. A KCUR investigation revealed that every detail the Kansas City Police Department told his family was false. His family is left to wonder why his black life didn't matter.
  • Cell phone Robbery

    The reporter Giovani Grizotti installed a spy application on mobile devices that ended up in the hands of criminals. And so he could track the way that the stolen mobiles traveled.
  • Dangerous Dollar Jitneys

    After scores of complaints, safety violations and a crash that killed an infant, WPIX went undercover and caught “dollar jitney” drivers committing dangerous acts behind the wheel: texting and talking on cell phones, illegally passing and speeding - endangering New York and New Jersey motorists, pedestrians and passengers. http://pix11.com/2015/11/20/pix11-investigation-exposes-dangerous-dollar-jitneys-traveling-ny-nj-roadways/ http://pix11.com/2015/11/23/pix11-investigation-sparks-police-probe-into-jitney-drivers-using-phones-behind-the-wheel/
  • 911: Lost On The Line

    A single death. A single 911 call. Together they reveal a nationwide problem: roughly half of all cell phone calls to 911 don't allow dispatchers to see the callers' location. Continuing our coverage over 10 major broadcast stories, a 30 minute primetime special, and a national USA Today article, we exposed this major public safety crisis and held the powerful accountable. Now the problem is getting fixed, and saving lives. NOTE: This story was primarily MMJ, produced by the reporter working alone as photographer and editor. https://youtu.be/XW7_pFKEDKc http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015/02/22/cellphone-911-lack-location-data/23570499/ http://www.11alive.com/story/news/local/investigations/2015/01/31/911-location-problems-/22645139/
  • Death in the Ring

    After 24-year-old Dennis Munson Jr. of Milwaukee collapsed following his first amateur kickboxing match in March, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter John Diedrich got a tip and started digging into what happened. What he uncovered was a series of errors by fight officials in an unregulated bout. The ringside doctor, referee and coach in the corner all missed obvious signs that Munson was in serious trouble, according to a dozen independent experts who reviewed the fight video for the Journal Sentinel. The doctor was looking at his cell phone when he should have been monitoring the fighters. The corner man propped up Munson between rounds and slapped him in the face and was holding him by the neck and face just before he collapsed. And the referee did not intervene to assess Munson. Medical care was delayed over a disagreement on care and confusion about how to get out of the building. Emergency medical protocol was not followed. And then video of the fight, provided to police, was missing 32 seconds at a key time, just before Munson collapsed. The Journal Sentinel investigation uncovered more problems in unregulated kickboxing in Wisconsin. For instance, state regulators attended a match at a Harley-Davidson dealership — but only to oversee boxing events.
  • Death in Paradise

    Two-story series on a Key West in-custody death which led city officials to ask the Department of Justice for a thorough investigation not only of Key West Police, but also of the state law enforcement agency, the district attorney and the county medical examiner. GM retiree Charles Eimers died following a routine traffic stop in Key West on Thanksgiving 2013. Police told emergency responders that Eimers fled a traffic stop, then ran away and collapsed on the beach, but a cell phone video acquired by CBS News showed Eimers surrendering before being surrounded by officers. Months later, CBS obtained a second tourist video that clearly showed police lied under oath in video depositions about the possibility that Eimers had been suffocated in the sand while being placed under arrest. Police and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which was called in to investigate the in-custody death, both had contact information to obtain the tourist video, but neglected to obtain it over the course of a seven month investigation.
  • The pilots of Instagram

    David Yanofsky reports in these feature stories how commercial airline pilots are using cell phones and GoPro cameras to record the unique vantage offered to them in the cockpit, despite such activity violating company and industry safety regulations. Some commercial pilots were even found to be taking pictures during the most critical phases of flight—during takeoff and landing, when most airline accidents occur. There’s a vibrant online community that follows these pilots and their striking photos on Instagram, apparently encouraging them to continue despite the passenger safety risks. Follow-up stories detailed the virulent reactions of some in the pilot community to the initial feature, and provided a graphical representation of FAA regulations to further highlight the issue.
  • DeKalb County's Climate of Corruption

    This investigation revealed a local government teeming with corruption, including kickbacks and theft of taxpayer dollars. They exposed rampant spending with no oversight, first through the use of county purchasing cards, then with an invoice payment system that also lacked controls. Their investigation caught county officials spending their discretionary budgets on airline tickets, family vacations, gift cards, cell phone bills, high-end electronics and other personal expenses. One commissioner even paid a speeding ticket and funneled tens of thousands of dollars to her boyfriend. Their reporting led to an ongoing FBI investigation, a guilty plea from a longtime county official, and pending subpoenas that could yield even more indictments. County leaders have enacted new spending policies and strengthened their board of ethics.