Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "child care" ...

  • BuzzFeed News: The Ghosts of the Orphanage

    As many as 5 million children passed through America’s orphanages in the 20th century alone. In other countries, national investigations have exposed at least some of what transpired in such institutions. But the dark secrets of orphanage life in the US had lain buried, like the dead children who haunt survivors’ dreams — until BuzzFeed News published Christine Kenneally’s unforgettable investigation.
  • Bucks County Courier Times: Hiding in Plain Sight

    After a toddler was found dead in an illegal day care center, Jo Ciavaglia and James McGinnis launched a three-month investigation of unlicensed, unmonitored and potentially dangerous child care centers operating in the Philadelphia Pa. area.
  • Born on Drugs

    What happens to children who are born drug-exposed - and what happens to their parents? Over the course of the generation spanning “crack babies” to “heroin babies,” California and the nation have made legal and philosophical shifts, removing fewer drug-exposed children from their parents’ care and working harder to make fractured families whole again. Sometimes, it works. Most often, it doesn’t.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Unwatched

    Stories about children hurt or killed while in childcare pop up often enough that the Austin American-Statesman’s investigative team started to wonder: How safe are Texas child cares? The Statesman's investigative team dug into thousands of pages of state records, made more than 100 public information requests, and spoke with dozens of families, experts and state officials. We analyzed 40,000 day care violations and built a database showing that child care providers are often not paying attention when children get hurt and that hundreds of operations have been cited for failing to tell both parents and the state when children are hurt. We sought to give readers a comprehensive look at safety issues in the Texas day care system — a system that serves more than 1 million children every day.
  • Mississippi Child Care Crisis

    Mississippi has some of the lowest standards for child care centers in the country and some of the weakest oversight. The Hechinger Report joined with the Clarion-Ledger to investigate how the state fails to serve all its children well, why it falls short and possible solutions. Our 18-month investigation revealed a child care system in Mississippi plagued by a lack of funding and support. We looked into low standards and pay for child care center employees, difficulties parents face in finding and paying for childcare, and years of legislative inaction in improving conditions for children. We highlighted solutions for the state, such as the Department of Defense’s strong child care system, and investigated trends, such as frequent absences among child care center directors. In December, Mississippi officials said the state would adopt a host of new strategies meant to reform the system, many of them similar to the best practices we wrote about.
  • Restraints and Seclusion in Public Schools

    Public schoolchildren across the country were physically restrained or isolated in rooms they couldn’t leave at least 267,000 times in the 2011-2012 school year, despite a near-consensus that such practices are dangerous and have no therapeutic benefit. Many states have little regulation or oversight of such practices.
  • Exposing the Unknown Dangers to Children: CA's Broken Day Care Oversight System

    In an ongoing year-long joint investigation, NBC Bay Area and The Center for Investigative Reporting peeled back the layers of California’s ineffective and antiquated day care oversight system, revealing parents’ little access to simple inspection information, infrequent checkups by state regulators and disorganization at the highest levels of state government. In a groundbreaking team effort, the journalists spent hundreds of hours scanning and organizing thousands of child care inspection documents, creating databases to analyze that information and then posting them online for the first time in California. The reporting brought transparency to an opaque and confusing system and put the problems into the public’s eye, leading to significant action by elected officials and a change in state law.
  • Children at Risk: Unregulated Day Care in Virginia

    The series revealed the deaths of 43 children at unregulated day-care homes in Virginia since 2004. About half the deaths were sleep-related and 10 involved physical abuse. In that same time frame, 17 children died in licensed day cares. Child care experts estimate that unregulated providers care for about one-third of all children in day care in Virginia. Unregulated providers are subject to no background checks, no training and no inspections. Because regulators don’t even know where the homes are located, the finding of the 43 deaths was news to government officials.
  • State's Child Care Oversight: Minimal Monitoring, Lax Enforcement

    Statistics show that nearly two-thirds of Connecticut children live in households where all parents (or providers) work. And reliance on child day care services for those families tops 80 percent. Yet, how good is Connecticut in ensuring the state’s 1,505 licensed day care centers are safe and meeting state standards? Lisa Chedekel spent three months reviewing state inspection reports for many of the state’s licensed day care centers to answer that question.
  • Daycare Deception

    This series of reports shows how lax government oversight has allowed state subsidized child-care centers to fraudulently collect millions of tax dollars. We found new centers popping up like dandelions to bilk the system. In one case, a former county welfare worker used her connections to open a daycare that collected more than 2 million in subsidies while offering very little actual child care. In another case, a provider hired her brother to provide food to the child care center at double the normal cost. That brother is now serving prison time for supporting a Somali terrorist organization.