Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "child molesters" ...

  • Juvenile Sexual Assaults Victims of Dr. William Ayres: The Forgotten Victims

    For forty years, hundreds of juveniles in San Mateo County, California were sexually assaulted in court-ordered sessions by prominent child psychiatrist Dr. William Ayres. But when the victims spoke out, they were either ignored or punished by authorities. It wasn’t until 2002, when journalist Victoria Balfour contacted police on behalf of one of Ayres’ victims, a private patient, that a criminal case against Ayres began to get traction. In 2013, Ayres, a former President of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, pleaded no contest to molesting boys who had been his private patients. He was sentenced to eight years in prison. However, Balfour had a fierce belief that the voices of his juvenile victims urgently needed to be heard in this case as well. When agencies in San Mateo County whose job it was to protect juveniles rebuffed her request to find the juvenile victims, Balfour embarked on a 3 and-a-half year project to find them herself. Working on a detective's theory that most of Ayres' juvenile victims were now in prison, she wrote to more than 300 inmates from San Mateo County and asked if they had been evaluated by Ayres. Balfour’s article recounts the horrifying and heartbreaking responses she received from inmates about their abuse by Dr. Ayres, one of the most prolific child molesters in recent California history.
  • Under The Radar

    In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world.
  • Under The Radar: A Scripps Washington Bureau Investigation of Military Sex Offenders After They Leave The Brig

    Under The Radar: A Scripps Washington Bureau Investigation In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world. The Scripps investigation, “Under The Radar” has triggered action at the national, state and local level after exposing several major problems when convicted military sex offenders are returned to civilian life.
  • Sex Predators Unleashed

    A 1999 Florida law passed after a 9-year-old boy was raped and murdered is supposed to protect the public by keeping the most dangerous sex predators locked up after their prison sentences end. But a Sun Sentinel investigation found the state’s safeguards broke down at every stage, setting rapists and child molesters free to harm again. Investigative reporter Sally Kestin and database specialist Dana Williams mined multiple data sources, using the state’s own records to reveal a horrific picture of recurring tragedy. The failures they uncovered prompted lawmakers to initiate the most comprehensive overhaul of Florida’s sex offender laws in more than a decade.
  • Sexually Violent Predators

    The Sacramento Bee investigates as a decade after the state of California adopted the nation's toughest laws regarding sexually violent predators, enforcement has fallen short of expectations. Those deemed to have the highest risk of being repeat offenders "were sent to Atascadero State Mental Hospital following their prison terms." But of 54 molesters released from the mental hospital, "none had gone through the full treatment regimen designed for them" and worse, "more than two-thirds underwent no treatment at all." In addition, "those who refused treatment had been released to society with fewer restrictions and less monitoring than the four who had completed the five-stage program."
  • Sex Offenders: Steps Away

    WPLG reports on lax enforcement of Florida's sex offender law. No convicted sex offender is supposed to live within 1,000 feet of a day care centers, but the investigation discovered that 536 such people were doing exactly that, including some in apartments overlooking day care centers. Law enforcement asserted it "lacked the resources and manpower to enforce the law." The state legislature is planning to take a hard look at what must be done to improve the situation. As part of the investigation, reporter Julie Summers compiled information including maps of the centers in relation to the offenders, and a list of Web sites people can use for more information.
  • NewsChannel 5 Investigates: Now Hiring Sex Offenders

    NewsChannel 5 investigated the hiring practices of McDonald's. The investigation uncovered dozens of child molesters and other convicted sex offenders had listed McDonald's as their employer. Several were later convicted of committing new crimes against McDonald's customers and young employees.The corporation's lack of hiring policies were found to be the cause of the problem: Background checks were only done "as needed."
  • School Felons

    In this investigation of non-teaching school workers in Cleveland, Ohio, it was found that more than a dozen have felony records. Many were child molesters, drug dealers, and elderly abusers. It was also found that criminal background checks were done randomly...less than five hundred random checks a year...which meant over four thousand employees were not checked. As a result to this investigation, a computer program tracking criminal records in over 70 jurisdictions was donated and ex-con workers were fired.
  • No Record Found

    WTHR Eyewitness News Investigators made a troubling discovery that threatens public safety: Indiana State Police criminal background checks often fail to show the record of dangerous criminals - including child molesters, burglars, and even murderers. Last year alone, the system was used 300,000 times by schools, daycares, nursing homes, and youth leagues.
  • Justice Withheld

    In 1941, Florida legislators passed a law that allows judges to block records of the convictions of felony offenders, sparing them a life of potential economic hardship and the scorn associated with being convicted felons. It was intended to be a one-time break to help first-time offenders, but it allows people to say they have never been convicted of a crime. The Herald examined how widespread "withholds" had become across Florida and who had been receiving them. The reporters analyzed a database containing millions of prison and probation records, finding that this law intended as a one-time break for first-time offenders had turned into something much more.