Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "children" ...

  • RE: Unguarded

    A three-day series examining the guardianship system in Pennsylvania.
  • ProPublica: Zero Tolerance

    ProPublica published a secret recording from inside a border patrol detention center which captured the anguish of children separated from their parents and forced the Trump Administration to reverse its family separation policy, then dug deeply into conditions at detention centers where thousands of separated children and unaccompanied minors have been sent.
  • ProPublica: The Child Abuse Contrarians

    Judges and juries hearing cases of alleged physical abuse of babies rely on expert witnesses to illuminate the medical evidence based on an impartial examination of the record and the victims. But in two fascinating investigative profiles co-published by ProPublica and The New Yorker, ProPublica Senior Reporter David Armstrong exposed a pair of sought-after expert witnesses who fall far short of this standard. Both work exclusively for accused child abusers and use dubious scientific arguments to make their case, potentially undermining justice and endangering children. Their success underscores the susceptibility of the U.S. judicial system to junk science, as well as the growing suspicion of mainstream medicine in an era when misinformation quickly spreads online.
  • NewsChannel 5 Investigates: Toxic School Water

    This yearlong investigation – more than two dozen stories that culminated in an hourlong, primetime special -- exposed students drinking lead-contaminated water inside Nashville schools, parents being kept in the dark about the test results, as well as officials secretly plotting to bypass lead filters to save money and using testing methods that disguised the real contamination. Through persistence and dogged reporting, we exposed a scandal that would make national news in 2018. As a result, the head of facilities for the school district was forced to resign. District officials were also pressured by Nashville’s mayor and health department to reform their testing practices. In addition, our intense focus on the issue in 2018 would be credited with reviving legislation that’s designed to help keep children across Tennessee safe.
  • Live 5 News: Failure to Protect

    A Charleston County School employee was arrested & charged with molesting 2 kids at a local elementary school. A Live 5 Investigation uncovered that school officials previously discovered child porn on his work issued laptop, but rather than firing him or placing him on administrative leave, they promoted him and named him employee the year. He was given new access to students, where he created the “Distinguished Gentlemen’s Club” and was later charged with molesting 2 children.
  • Lead in the Water: A Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Watchdog Report

    An investigation into deep-seated problems in the City of Milwaukee's program for testing children for lead poisoning that revealed dysfunction and neglect putting children at risk.
  • Kids on the Line: An investigation into the contractors behind family separation

    As the U.S. government’s family separation policy played out in real time, Reveal’s investigation uncovered major problems with the contractors tasked with caring for immigrant children, including a defense company holding immigrant children in unlicensed facilities -- vacant office buildings in Phoenix without yards, showers or kitchens -- and a Texas shelter drugging immigrant children without their consent.
  • Kaiser Health News and USA TODAY Network: Surgery Center deaths

    Millions of Americans are having routine surgeries performed at the nation’s 5,600-plus surgery centers, the small facilities that promise to get you in and out quickly, and at a much lower cost. But some of those facilities lack the staff or training to handle emergencies, and have been taking on increasingly fragile patients. It’s a dangerous situation that has put patients’ lives at risk and even children’s lives at risk, a groundbreaking investigation by Kaiser Health News and USA Today Network discovered. Hundreds of patients, some as young as two, have died after having surgeries as simple as tonsillectomies or colonoscopies. And at least 7,000 patients a year had to be raced by ambulance to a local hospital when something went wrong.
  • Girls in polygamous Kingston Group continue to marry as young as 15, records show, sometimes leaving Utah to marry cousins

    While much of the focus of any polygamous group is on marriages that happen outside the law, an investigation showed how in one sect girls as young as 15 are driven or flown out of Utah to marry legally. This is done to find states that are less restrictive about the ages of the brides and grooms and where cousin marriages are legal, and in order to keep girls in the sect.
  • Chalkbeat and Bridge: The crisis caused by students changing schools

    A detailed examination of a serious education crises that had been largely unknown in Detroit: Parents repeatedly moving their children from one struggling school to the next in an often-futile quest to find better educational options. In a city where school choice policies encourage school shopping, research shows that 1 in 3 elementary school students changes schools every year. Yet few local leaders or policymakers were aware of the high rates of student churn. Even fewer understood the impact that so much movement has on schools and on the ability of students to succeed. Our five-part series, called “Moving Costs,” set out to change that by telling the stories in a single classroom, where the typical student had cycled through four or more schools on the road to eighth grade. It shed light on the turmoil in classrooms where teachers must routinely scramble to accommodate new students, then see them leave mid-year without saying good-bye.