Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "children" ...

  • CBS News: Investigating the Catholic Church

    CBS News investigation into the Catholic Church cover up of the systemic abuse of children by priests.
  • BuzzFeed News: The Ghosts of the Orphanage

    As many as 5 million children passed through America’s orphanages in the 20th century alone. In other countries, national investigations have exposed at least some of what transpired in such institutions. But the dark secrets of orphanage life in the US had lain buried, like the dead children who haunt survivors’ dreams — until BuzzFeed News published Christine Kenneally’s unforgettable investigation.
  • Born on Drugs

    What happens to children who are born drug-exposed - and what happens to their parents? Over the course of the generation spanning “crack babies” to “heroin babies,” California and the nation have made legal and philosophical shifts, removing fewer drug-exposed children from their parents’ care and working harder to make fractured families whole again. Sometimes, it works. Most often, it doesn’t.
  • BBC: Anatomy of a Killing

    In July 2018 a horrifying video began to circulate on social media. It shows two women and two young children being led away at gunpoint by a group of Cameroonian soldiers. The captives are blindfolded, forced to the ground, and shot 22 times. The government of Cameroon initially dismissed the video as "fake news." But BBC Africa Eye, through forensic analysis of the footage, proved exactly where this happened, when it happened, and who is responsible for the killings.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Unwatched

    Stories about children hurt or killed while in childcare pop up often enough that the Austin American-Statesman’s investigative team started to wonder: How safe are Texas child cares? The Statesman's investigative team dug into thousands of pages of state records, made more than 100 public information requests, and spoke with dozens of families, experts and state officials. We analyzed 40,000 day care violations and built a database showing that child care providers are often not paying attention when children get hurt and that hundreds of operations have been cited for failing to tell both parents and the state when children are hurt. We sought to give readers a comprehensive look at safety issues in the Texas day care system — a system that serves more than 1 million children every day.
  • The Innocents: How U.S. Immigration Policy Punishes Migrant Children

    Federal immigration policies that separated children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border had real, traumatic consequences on the most vulnerable members of our society. This series of exclusive investigations identified “tender age shelters” warehousing babies and toddlers, exposed a Virginia shelter where migrant teenagers described horrific abuse and followed a Salvadoran mother who came close to losing her daughter to adoption, revealing the legal possibility that separated children could be permanently taken from their parents. AP also followed the money, highlighting the billion-dollar business in migrant child detention, a sector that has grown tenfold in the last decade. Just before year’s end, AP broke the news that the government was keeping most of the 14,000 migrant kids in its care in shelters with hundreds of others, despite expert warnings that mass institutionalization can cause life-long trauma. Based on deep source reporting and exclusive data, the story was the first to provide the number of children in every government-contracted detention center, shelter and foster care program dating back to 2017 - data the government had been withholding all year.
  • AP: Hidden Victims

    The Pentagon and DOJ often fail to provide basic justice when the children of service members sexually assault each other on American military bases worldwide.
  • Alternative schools bear the brunt of student deaths in Chicago

    This investigative story shines a light on why Chicago students who’ve died are most likely to attend an alternative school and the lack of resources these schools have historically been provided by Chicago Public Schools to help students cope with the deaths of their classmates and other traumas. While many stories have focused on how Chicago’s gun violence hurts children and teens, this story used never-before-published data and more than 50 interviews to examine how gun violence is impacting the education of some of the city’s most vulnerable students. Public alternative high schools are often considered schools of “last resort” that take in children who’ve had discipline, attendance and academic issues in their prior schools. It’s often where students with gang affiliations and safety concerns are sent. And it’s where students are most likely to die.
  • 12 News I-Team: Predators in Plain Sight

    In this 12 News I-Team report, were looking at protecting our most precious resource, our children. Arizona families rely on the state sex offender registry to keep them informed on whether a sex offender lives in their neighborhood or has recently moved in.
  • 12 News I-Team: Children At Risk

    12 News worked tirelessly to defend the public interest in an exclusive investigation, ’12 News- I-Team: Children At Risk’ which exposed a pattern of abuse affecting some of the most vulnerable members of our community, defenseless foster children. Through filing records requests, following up on anonymous tips, combing through legal documents, and mining dozens of sources, investigative reporter Bianca Buono uncovered the unthinkable: the Department of Child Services placed a six-year-old foster child directly into the home of a level three convicted sex offender.