Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "children" ...

  • "Predator Priests" Grand Jury Report

    In August 2018, Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro released a grand jury report outlining the alleged abuse of hundreds of children at the hands of priests in several Roman Catholic Dioceses across Pennsylvania. Investigative reporter Paul Van Osdol began immediately sifting through the report to find out where the men outlined in the report were today and what they were doing. The most shocking case he uncovered was that of an accused priest from the Pittsburgh Catholic Diocese who was a practicing counselor just across the state line in Ohio.
  • Zero Tolerance

    ProPublica published a secret recording from inside a border patrol detention center which captured the anguish of children separated from their parents and forced the Trump Administration to reverse its family separation policy, then dug deeply into conditions at detention centers where thousands of separated children and unaccompanied minors have been sent.
  • Forcing the Peace

    WCPO's I-Team investigated police use of force involving officers at 32 local police departments. Our investigation uncovered excessive force, unreported use of force and identified the police officer who punched more people in the face than any other local cop. We also revealed black children were more likely than adults to be tased by police.
  • Heartbroken

    Heart surgery patients at the prestigious Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg died at a stunning rate, despite warnings that the procedures were putting kids at risk.
  • Parkland

    The South Florida Sun Sentinel dug deep to expose the cascade of errors that preceded and followed the school shooting at Parkland and cost children their lives.
  • Toxic City: Sick Schools

    Children in Philadelphia public schools endure environmental hazards -- deteriorated asbestos, damaged lead paint, festering mold and rodent droppings -- that deprive them of a healthy place to learn and thrive. In reaching our major findings, we conducted 175 scientific tests at 19 elementary schools at a cost of nearly $9,000, built a custom database to analyze more than 250,000 room-by-room environmental records, and interviewed more than 120 teachers, parents, students and experts.
  • The Ghosts of the Orphanage

    As many as 5 million children passed through America’s orphanages in the 20th century alone. In other countries, national investigations have exposed at least some of what transpired in such institutions. But the dark secrets of orphanage life in the US had lain buried, like the dead children who haunt survivors’ dreams — until BuzzFeed News published Christine Kenneally’s unforgettable investigation.
  • How Texas Keeps Tens of Thousands of Children Out of Special Education

    In “Denied,” the Houston Chronicle revealed that a group of Texas state officials had arbitrarily decided what percentage of students should receive special education services and had enforced the benchmark by intensely auditing school districts for “over-identification.” The effort, which began in 2004 but was never announced and remained completely unknown outside of district special education departments, saved the state billions of dollars but denied critical help to tens of thousands of children with disabilities. As a result, the Chronicle reported, Texas now provides special education services to a lower percentage of its students than any other state in the country – by far. If Texas gave services at the same rate as everybody else, more than 250,000 more children in the state would be receiving services such as tutoring, counseling and therapy.
  • Cosecha de Miseria (Harvest of Misery)

    A yearlong investigation by Telemundo and The Weather Channel gathered evidence that child labor is commonplace during the coffee harvest in Chiapas, the poorest state in Mexico -- illustrating in stark, human terms the failures and limitations of an elaborate global system of third-party monitoring established by the coffee industry to assure its sourcing is ethical, and a violation of international agreements and laws meant to prohibit child labor. By following the supply chain to the source, the investigation also revealed how global agreements and the laws of nations prohibit such labors by children, who were found filling and lugging heavy bags of coffee while living in harsh conditions. Result: A documentary in which reporters take viewers on a gritty, real-world tour to the bottom of the murky coffee supply chain, where feel-good marketing clashes with harsh realities socially conscious consumers may find surprising if not shocking.
  • Coal Uncovered

    "Coal Uncovered" is a two-part local news investigation into the coal handling industry on the Mobile River, and its effects on the citizens living in downtown Mobile, Ala. Folks living in the area worry their health is at risk due to the consistent build-up of what appears to be coal dust on their homes. FOX10 News hired an independent laboratory to test dust samples taken from five locations across downtown, to see if coal dust was indeed the culprit. The test results revealed every sample contained significant percentages of coal dust, validating the concerns of the residential community. Further, this investigation exposes a caught-on-camera phone call made by a tax-dollar paid coal industry leader, allowing FOX10 News to inform the public about what really goes on behind industry lines. This investigation exposes the effects of a powerful industry in Mobile, of which residents and school children are withstanding every day. It holds tax-dollar funded agencies accountable, and gives a voice to the people of downtown Mobile, whose complaints and concerns have long been ignored.