Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "children" ...

  • Season 1 from Someone Knows Something

    The true crime investigative podcast, Someone Knows Something (SKS), explores a different cold case every season. The first season delved into the mysterious case of five-year-old Adrien McNaughton, who vanished on a family fishing trip in 1972. SKS host David Ridgen, a celebrated documentarian and filmmaker, grew up in the same small town in Eastern Ontario as the McNaughton family. Through his investigation, Ridgen discovers new information about who was present at the lake that day, and uncovers a series of surprising new leads suggesting what might have happened to Adrien, including signals from four cadaver dogs, which suggest that there may be human remains in Holmes Lake, near where Adrien was fishing that day.
  • The Traffickers: The Girl in the Window

    The Traffickers is an investigative documentary series which traces the global trafficking routes of some of the world’s most sought after commodities: Gold, exotic animals, sex, even human body parts - anything can be bought for a price. The aim was ambitious - to give an exclusive guide to the global black market world, with high production values, excellent cinematography, dynamic story-telling and outstanding journalism. The series is presented by Nelufar Hedayat, who herself was trafficked as a child refugee from war-torn Afghanistan. During the course of filming, Nelufar visited 22 different countries, criss-crossing the world to follow the story. The Dark Side of Adoption reveals how American couples adopting babies from the DRC can be caught up in an adoption scam which hoodwinks unsuspecting parents into giving up their children.
  • Toxic Safety

    A child’s car seat is the only consumer product that is required by law in all 50 states and it is crucial to keep a child safe in the car. However, this investigation revealed false advertising, legal loopholes and outdated federal regulations are exposing millions of children to concerning, even known-cancer-causing chemicals, in their car seats with no apparent safety benefit. Over the course of a year, KPIX lit car seats on fire, commissioned lab tests on car seats and the kids who use them, searched public records, mined social media, analyzed national car fire data and interviewed experts from every applicable industry. The resulting series sparked action by lawmakers, industry groups, consumer advocates, federal regulators and car seat
  • Denied: How Texas Keeps Tens of Thousands of Children Out of Special Education

    In “Denied,” the Houston Chronicle revealed that a group of Texas state officials had arbitrarily decided what percentage of students should receive special education services and had enforced the benchmark by intensely auditing school districts for “over-identification.” The effort, which began in 2004 but was never announced and remained completely unknown outside of district special education departments, saved the state billions of dollars but denied critical help to tens of thousands of children with disabilities. As a result, the Chronicle reported, Texas now provides special education services to a lower percentage of its students than any other state in the country – by far. If Texas gave services at the same rate as everybody else, more than 250,000 more children in the state would be receiving services such as tutoring, counseling and therapy.
  • The God Loophole

    At least 16 states exempt religious daycares from standard licensing rules. In six states, the exemptions are so broad that even the most basic rules are lifted – such as bans on beating kids, how many workers must be hired to watch children and whether they need to be trained in CPR. The results can be tragic.
  • Failing at Fire Drills

    This yearlong investigation into school fire preparedness revealed repeated failures by school, city and state officials charged with the safety of Philadelphia’s and Pennsylvania’s school children.
  • Mississippi Child Care Crisis

    Mississippi has some of the lowest standards for child care centers in the country and some of the weakest oversight. The Hechinger Report joined with the Clarion-Ledger to investigate how the state fails to serve all its children well, why it falls short and possible solutions. Our 18-month investigation revealed a child care system in Mississippi plagued by a lack of funding and support. We looked into low standards and pay for child care center employees, difficulties parents face in finding and paying for childcare, and years of legislative inaction in improving conditions for children. We highlighted solutions for the state, such as the Department of Defense’s strong child care system, and investigated trends, such as frequent absences among child care center directors. In December, Mississippi officials said the state would adopt a host of new strategies meant to reform the system, many of them similar to the best practices we wrote about.
  • Failure to Protect series

    In a four-day series, The Daily Sentinel examined the killings of three children who were known to the local child-welfare system, as part of a broader examination of the child welfare and foster care systems in the county. The purpose was to inform the public about how the children ended up living with the people who ultimately killed them or were accused of killing them, the warning signs, the fallout that resulted from the deaths, and identify possible changes to the system that could prevent future killings.
  • Medical Misbehavior

    In Human Testing, we exclusively expose the heartbreaking story of human experimentation done by the federal government and major teaching and research hospitals. In Bitter Pills, we trace the horrifying journey of a young man who grew large breasts as an alleged side effect of Risperdal, a drug that doctors widely misprescribed for unapproved uses in children. Medical misbehavior is an under-reported topic that we have a keen interest in, since it’s difficult for many news organizations to tackle the issue today (due to advertising by medical interests). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bFGi1MJnt8
  • Desperate Choices: Giving Up Custody For Care

    Lisa Chedekel, senior writer, Connecticut Health I-Team, uncovered a practice within the state's Department of Children and Families (DCF) of coercing parents of children with severe behavioral problems to give up custody of their children, in exchange for needed care. Although DCF officials said the practice was rare, C-HIT found that more than 860 children were given up to state custody since 2011 because their families could not access "specialized care." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfa8wsOdrog