Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "children" ...

  • Reset Films: The Syndrome

    The Syndrome is an explosive documentary following the crusade of a group of doctors who have uncovered that Shaken Baby Syndrome, a child abuse theory responsible for hundreds of prosecutions each year in the US, is not scientifically valid. Filmmaker Meryl Goldsmith teams with investigative reporter Susan Goldsmith to document the unimaginable nightmare for those accused and shine a light on the men and women dedicating their lives to defending the prosecuted and freeing the convicted. Shaken baby proponents are determined to silence their critics while an unthinkable number of lives are ruined.
  • Reliving Agent Orange

    Four decades after the Vietnam War, scientists are still learning how exposure to the defoliant Agent Orange has harmed veterans and their children. This report showed that the Department of Veterans Affairs has hesitated to compensate sick veterans, instead weighing political and financial costs in secret. To bolster their position, they found that government officials have routinely turned to a known skeptic of Agent Orange’s deadly effects – a scientist who has also been paid by the chemical makers. And they obtained internal VA data on hundreds of thousands of vets and conducted a first-of-its-kind analysis, producing new evidence suggesting a connection between Agent Orange and birth defects that experts say should force the government to take action. https://www.propublica.org/article/agent-orange-vietnam-veterans-their-families-share-stories-exposure https://projects.propublica.org/graphics/alvin-young
  • Immigrant Children Uncounted

    Japanese local governments fail to track school enrollments of more than ten thousand children with foreign nationality, while Japanese-national counterparts were fully cared to attend school, Kyodo News investigation found. Although all uncounted children are not necessarily out of education, the figure alarms that the government's discriminatory treatment of immigrant children violates the International Human Right Law.
  • Title I and School Funding Inequality

    The largest and most expensive federal education program, Title I, is meant to ensure that poor children living in high-poverty school districts have access to the same education opportunities as their wealthier peers. But our investigation found that 20 percent of Title I money – $2.6 billion – ends up in school districts with higher than average proportions of wealthy families. Because of quirks in the formula that doles out the money, Title I can often increase the local funding inequality that it was created to stop. Despite various policy proposals that would direct more money to concentrations of poverty, Congress has lacked the will to act. http://www.usnews.com/news/slideshows/which-schools-receive-the-most-title-i-funding http://www.usnews.com/photos/2016/06/01/photos-fairfax-virginia-school-district http://www.usnews.com/photos/2016/06/01/photos-nottoway-virginia-school-district
  • When a 14-Year-Old Chooses to Die Because of Religion, Can Anyone Stop Him?

    KUOW online editor Isolde Raftery reported and wrote a devastating, nuanced account of how a Jehovah’s Witness teen, who had been diagnosed with leukemia, was allowed to refuse blood transfusions, a decision that ultimately cost him his life. Washington is believed to be the first state where a child has died after being allowed to refuse lifesaving care.
  • Fugitive Fathers

    The Catholic Church has allowed priests accused of sexually abusing children in the United States and Europe to relocate to poor parishes in South America, a year-long GlobalPost investigation has found. GlobalPost Senior Correspondent Will Carless and videographer Jimmy Chalk confronted five accused priests. One who relocated to a poor parish in Peru admitted on camera to molesting a 13-year-old boy while working in the Jackson, Mississippi diocese. Another is currently under investigation in Brazil after allegations arose that he abused disadvantaged children living in an orphanage he founded there. All five were able to continue working as priests, despite criminal investigations or cash payouts to alleged victims. All enjoyed the privilege, respect and unfettered access to young people that comes with being clergy members. http://www.globalpost.com/article/6677019/2015/10/28/priest-almost-got-away http://www.globalpost.com/article/6655538/2015/09/23/could-vatican-face-racketeering-charges-harboring-abusive-clergy http://www.globalpost.com/article/6649057/2015/09/14/fugitive-fathers http://www.globalpost.com/article/6669574/2015/10/15/fugitive-fathers-two-priests-have-been-suspended-globalposts http://www.globalpost.com/article/6653949/2015/09/21/survivor-advocates-critique-pope-francis-lack-real-progress-priest-sex http://www.globalpost.com/article/6649016/2015/09/14/us-priests-accused-child-sex-abuse-find-refuge-south-american-churches http://www.globalpost.com/article/6663599/2015/10/06/explainer-how-abusive-priests-are-able-relocate-abroad http://www.globalpost.com/article/6650841/2015/09/16/us-priests-accused-sex-abusive-get-second-chance-relocating-south-america
  • Contaminated Soil Lingers Where Apples Once Grew

    An Oregon Public Broadcasting and Northwest Public Radio collaboration found Washington officials failed to address known soil contamination at former orchard sites, leaving children at risk of exposure that could elevate their risk of lowered IQ, behavioral problems or cancer later in life.
  • Ghost Schools

    In America’s long, bloody, and frustrating war in Afghanistan, the U.S. government has consistently trumpeted one major victory: education. More than a billion dollars was poured into building schools and educating Afghan children, in part to prevent the Taliban from recruiting a new generation of soldiers. But a BuzzFeed News investigation found those claims to be massively exaggerated, riddled with ghost schools, teachers, and students that exist only on paper.
  • Fostering Profits

    This BuzzFeed News investigative series exposes the widespread abuse of children and teenagers at National Mentor Holdings, the nation's leading firm in the lucrative but secretive industry of for-profit foster care, where state governments pay private companies to recruit, train, and hire foster parents, place children, and then even hire the social workers who are supposed to oversee and monitor the children's well-being.
  • Home Sweet Hustle

    For 15 years, the Portland nonprofit Give Us This Day occupied a unique place among foster-care agencies in the state of Oregon. Its four group homes served the most troubled, challenging kids in the state—children who had been sexually abused, starved, beaten and abandoned. It was the state’s only African-American-run foster care agency, a distinction that made it especially valuable to the state agency that manages housing for foster children, the Oregon Department of Human Services. The executive director of Give Us This Day, Mary Holden, was lauded as a human-rights champion. Give Us This Day was also unique in how leniently it was regulated by state officials. The state turned a blind eye to more than 1,000 police reports at foster homes run by Give Us This Day. It regularly paid large cash advances to the provider—something no other foster-care agency requested so regularly. And the Department of Human Services ignored years of allegations that Give Us This Day neglected children.