Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "city council" ...

  • Memphis councilman Berlin Boyd’s business relationships entangled in FedEx Logistics move

    If you thought a person couldn’t be on more than two sides of a deal, our investigation will encourage you to think again. In a city that serves as the global headquarters to FedEx, the logistics giant looms large over civic life. But while there’s long been precedent of a rotating door between the company and the Chamber of Commerce and City Council, our investigation revealed new heights of dueling loyalties in the form of a local legislator, Berlin Boyd.
  • The Verge with The Investigative Fund: Palantir has Secretly Been Using New Orleans to Test Predictive Policing Technology

    For the past 6 years, the data-mining firm Palantir — co-founded by Peter Thiel — has used New Orleans as a testing ground for predictive policing, Ali Winston reported for the Verge, in partnership with The Investigative Fund. Palantir has lucrative contracts with the Pentagon, U.S. intelligence and foreign security services. The partnership with the NOPD was similar to the "heat list" in Chicago that purports to predict which people are likely drivers or victims of violence. Yet, not only did the program not go through a public procurement process, key city council members in New Orleans didn't even know it existed.
  • PublicSource: Revelations of police technology problems spark FBI scrutiny, alleged retaliation and unfinished work

    For the first time, PublicSource reported how Pittsburgh's reform-minded police chief touched off an FBI investigation into how city employee's handled software contracts. Included were projects that were never implemented by 2018, though they were fully paid for five years earlier using federal funds. The federal investigation ended without any charges, but internal investigations in the city were ongoing. A former officer also claims he faced retaliation for reporting concerns about tech projects, specifically from one of the city's highest ranking public safety officials. He is currently suing the city over several of the same concerns first publicly reported in our stories. Our stories led directly to internal changes in city purchasing and increased scrutiny of purchasing by City Council.
  • AJC: Atlanta City Hall Investigation

    Former Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed’s administration illegally withheld public records from voters and City Council until The Atlanta Journal-Constitution forced them open, revealing $800,000 in improperly awarded employee bonuses and cash prizes, charges to city credit cards for personal entertainment and travel, and runaway spending on outside attorneys close to the mayor. The AJC also found that Reed withheld from the public and council the scope of the federal corruption investigation at City Hall, and concealed a six-figure settlement with an airport official who he fired and who later accused him of steering contracts.
  • How Atlanta Trampled the Public’s Right to Know: An AJC/WSB-TV Investigation

    In 2018, The AJC and WSB-TV revealed how the Kasim Reed administration illegally acted to withhold public records from the public and Atlanta City Council, doctored legal invoices to conceal the cost of a federal corruption investigation, withheld government documents to hide the scope of the corruption probe and concealed a six-figure settlement with a fired airport official.
  • Silent Majority/Mayoria Silenciosa

    A first-of-its-kind analysis found deep patterns of under-representation of the fast growing Hispanic population on city councils and county commissioners courts across Texas. http://projects.statesman.com/news/latino-representation/
  • Undisclosed police misconduct in Springfield, Mass.

    These stories document a series of misconduct allegations against Springfield, Mass. police officers which remained undisclosed by authorities until uncovered by reporters with MassLive/The Republican. Drawing on public records requests, interviews with alleged victims and tips from confidential sources, the series centers on three incidents: the death of a prisoner in Springfield Police headquarters, the suspension of a detective who threatened to kill a juvenile suspect and an investigation into allegations that off-duty officers beat a group of men after an argument at a bar. The series has led to changes in how the city reports police misconduct allegations, an effort by city councilors to reinstate a civilian police commission and an external review of the department’s internal investigations unit.
  • Information Roadblock

    This story outlines the push-back we received from city leaders when we tried to obtain emails that might explain why and how a city council member tried to closed off a public street at the request of a Homeowners Association in an affluent neighborhood without notifying, or getting any input from the residents in the adjoining subdivision. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiZO3Ctg-0M&feature=youtu.be
  • Undisclosed police misconduct in Springfield, Mass.

    These stories document a series of misconduct allegations against Springfield, Mass. police officers which remained undisclosed by authorities until uncovered by reporters with MassLive/The Republican. Drawing on public records requests, interviews with alleged victims and tips from confidential sources, the series centers on three incidents: the death of a prisoner in Springfield Police headquarters, the suspension of a detective who threatened to kill a juvenile suspect and an investigation into allegations that off-duty officers beat a group of men after an argument at a bar. The series has led to changes in how the city reports police misconduct allegations, an effort by city councilors to reinstate a civilian police commission and an external review of the department’s internal investigations unit.
  • Bonds & Fees

    Amarillo had a November election that included seven bond issues. The city council also decided to increase water fees over a five-year period. This story explores the total cost to tax payers if all the bonds pass and all the water fees go into effect.