Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "city" ...

  • A False Diamond: Reverse Mortgage Series Leads to Statewide Reform

    This series exposed the reverse mortgage/home repair scam Chicago businessman Mark Diamond had perpetrated for decades against elderly black homeowners on the city’s South and West Sides. The project also revealed the civil justice system’s toothlessness and raised pointed questions about how much havoc one person can wreak in the civil sphere before facing any criminal consequences. The project sparked a hearing by a state senator, media pickup, the filing and passage of state legislation and community action.
  • The Laquan McDonald shooting and the city's broken system

    Under orders from a judge, Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s administration on Nov. 24, haltingly and reluctantly, released a police dash-cam video that showed a white police officer shooting a black teenager, Laquan McDonald. The video roiled Chicago. Protesters took to the streets. The police superintendent was fired. The officer who shot McDonald -- a ward of the state -- was charged with murder. And the U.S. Justice Department launched a civil rights investigation into the nation’s second largest police department. During the next three weeks, Tribune reporters set out to examine how the city and the Chicago Police Department had reached this point, and to put into context McDonald’s life and his fatal encounter with a department with a sordid history of brutality against minorities.
  • Univision: A Tall Tale or Un cuento chino in Spanish

    A Tall Tale tells the story of a Chinese businessman who was arrested for drug trafficking after $205 million was seized from his Mexico City mansion and the political and corporate interests that underpinned his prosecution.
  • Driving with suspended license top crime in Menlo Park, many lose cars

    Over 4.4 million Californians have suspended driver’s licenses simply because they can’t afford to pay a traffic ticket. We chronicled the impact on everyday people and showed how minorities are affected disproportionately, focusing on the Silicon Valley city of Menlo Park, with populations representing the very affluent and the very poor.
  • How Cash Sent the Portland Housing Market Spinning

    Cash is king in red-hot Portland real estate, representing a full one-third of single-family home sales in 2014. Lee van der Voo’s seven-part series on the Portland housing market has uncovered in stark outline the often-obscured influence of cash from developers, foreign buyers and Wall Street in driving affordable housing from the city. Twenty-six investors who purchased more than 10 homes for cash in the listed market in Multnomah County through the recession. Average Black and Native American households priced out of the city. A publicly traded company that is renting out more than 200 Portland-area homes in a new twist on the asset-securitization that drove the Great Recession. The pension funds of teachers and police officers invested in cash-rich Wall Street landlords who compete on the housing market with the very middle-class professionals whose pensions they hold. With van der Voo’s reporting, an economic crisis that everyone in town talked about but no one could explain was given names, faces and numbers — and a hope of being fixed.
  • Living on the Edge

    A summer series about the growth of Edmonton, a Canadian city of about 1 million whose economy is driven by the development of the Alberta oilsands, 300 miles northeast of Edmonton. Living on the Edge examined how and where Edmonton is growing and explored the issues affecting the new residents in the burgeoning suburbs that ring in the city.
  • Juarez, A Fragile Peace

    This investigation was among the first ones to look back in time and write a poignant narrative on how the battle between the Juarez and Sinaloa drug cartels and the co-option of police forces as fighters for their criminal causes, turned the streets of this U.S.-Mexico border city into rivers of blood. It focused on how peace was obtained in 2012 with a combination of civic and government involvement, the arrival of a top tough-as-nails police chief who cleaned up the police, and intelligence provided by DEA informants that help jail top drug leaders, thus diffusing the fight.
  • Midway Police Shooting Investigation

    Team 10 Investigators fought against the San Diego Police Department's refusal to release documents and surveillance video of an incident in which a San Diego Police Officer shot an unarmed mentally disabled man. Team 10 took the battle for transparency all the way to Federal Court resulting in an order compelling the San Diego District Attorney to release the information and video. As a result of our investigation several policies within the department were changed and the City of San Diego purchased additional body cameras for police officers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPjCjn3yVeg
  • Historic Flood: Houston’s Emergency Response

    Within days of historic flooding that left 8 people dead and parts of Houston devastated, the KPRC investigative team began digging for answers on the city’s emergency response to the hardest hit areas. Our primary focus started with the deaths of 3 citizens who were thrown into raging flood waters when a fire department rescue boat capsized. Our Open Records Request for the boat’s maintenance logs and emergency communications during that rescue yielded a shocking discovery about how unprepared firefighters were for this severe weather event. https://youtu.be/nDKfvSiujpI
  • The LaQuan McDonald Investigation

    An investigation into a police shooting of a 17-year old. Our investigation uncovered the following: allegations that police failed to properly interview witnesses; a claim that Chicago police on the scene that night erased 86-minutes of video from surveillance cameras at a nearby Burger King; that none of the police cars on the scene recorded audio and only two of the original five squad cars recorded video; that failure to record audio was in violation of a special police order; that none of the cars on the scene reported any dash cam malfunctions; that police reports were in direct contradiction to what was seen on the video; that city emails showed top aides to the Mayor were corresponding about the video months before the Mayor claimed he was told in detail what happened. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vH9t8LPofrM&feature=youtu.be