Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "city" ...

  • KCUR Investigates: Ryan Stokes Was Killed By A Kansas City Cop. His Family Wants Police To Tell The Truth

    Ryan Stokes' name isn't mentioned in the same breath as Trayvon Martin or Michael Brown, but it should be. Stokes, a 24-year-old black man in Kansas City, was killed by a police officer after he was wrongfully accused of stealing a white man's cell phone. A KCUR investigation revealed that every detail the Kansas City Police Department told his family was false. His family is left to wonder why his black life didn't matter.
  • KC Star: Stalk. Murder. Repeat.

    Robert J. Gross was a longtime serial murder suspect in Kansas City, implicated in at least four killings over five decades. But he had never been charged in any of them, even though police had been tracking him for years.
  • Investigation to Resignation to Plea Deal

    The press secretary for Houston's mayor hid thousands of emails from the media after a records request. Those emails would show she was spending significant amounts of time pitching reality shows to Hollywood producers while on the clock for the city of Houston. That decision was exposed and led to her eventual arrest: a major message to public officials that violations of the open records act can lead to criminal charges.
  • Fox45: What Transparency Looks Like

    Baltimore is a city in crisis. Its murder rate is the highest in the nation. Its school system is among the lowest performing. For decades, its government has hidden behind a culture of secrecy and corruption. More than one year ago, Fox45 decided it had enough and challenged the status quo. On behalf of students, parents and taxpayers, Fox45 took the drastic step of suing Baltimore’s $1.4 billion school system - one of the nation’s largest. In the fall of 2017, when City Schools denied the entirety of a Project Baltimore public records request concerning the results of an internal grade changing investigation, Fox45 sued the school board. That internal investigation stemmed from a series of Fox45 reports which exposed a culture of grade fixing and pushing students through a broken school system. To date, Fox45 has accrued more than $100,000 in legal fees. But, so far, City Schools has been forced to capitulate. Bit by bit, over the year, they have handed over more than 10,000 pages of documents. And our fight is not over yet. The trial is scheduled for February 11. When it concludes, Fox45 will take another drastic step and send a strong message by filing a motion to recuperate our legal fees from Baltimore City Public Schools. “What Transparency Looks Like” was produced by Project Baltimore, a team of Fox45 journalists committed to a long-term investigation into Baltimore area schools.
  • Flood of Distrust: A Story on San Diego’s Mismanaged Water Department

    “Flood of Distrust” is the culmination of our year-long investigation into the San Diego water department. We found the department was unable to perform basic functions for citizens of the country’s eighth largest city. Our work prompted the city to refund tens of thousands of dollars to customers and caused significant changes in the department’s management, including the abrupt exit of the department’s director. “Flood of Distrust” exposes a mismanaged and unsupervised public utility department, a department that cost San Diegans thousands of dollars and is in desperate need of repair.
  • FLIPPED: Secrets Inside a Corrupt Police Department

    This is a year-long investigation of a corrupt police department that was operating as a criminal enterprise. A one-man-band investigative reporter revealed institutional and systemic failures inside a large Metro Atlanta police department. By cultivating internal police sources, he was able to demand specific, hidden public records that uncovered several scandals the Roswell Police Department tried to keep secret from the public. This investigation and public records fight resulted in the resignation of the police chief, the firing of three police officers, and an overhaul of the city's open records system to improve public access.
  • Dishonor at Dallas City Hall

    Lies. Deceit. Taxpayer betrayal. They were all there, and more, hidden deep inside Dallas City Hall until our investigative team began asking questions. Our work ultimately resulted in the resignation and federal guilty plea of the second most powerful official in city government, Mayor Pro Tem Dwaine Caraway. In addition, four other people we investigated ultimately pleaded guilty in federal court. It was one of the biggest political scandals in Dallas history.
  • Deadly Delay: Tampa's Broken Ambulance System

    An ambulance responding to a heart attack call broke down, costing the patient valuable time that could have saved his life. The ABC Action News I-Team found out that ambulance was old, was unreliable and, unfortunately, was typical of Tampa's advanced life support ambulance fleet. We discovered the city spent millions of new parks from the same fund which could have replaced aging ambulances, which put lives at risk.
  • Daily Iowegian: Indian Hills Community College

    The Indian Hills Community College baseball team in Iowa ousted two of its coaches — one of them a hall of fame coach — in May. After a more than four-month investigation, the Daily Iowegian found the coaches were removed after an internal investigation that coaches forced players to work for security companies at NFL and Big 10 games in Minneapolis and Iowa City, all while assigning fake names to foreign-born students so they could work around federal immigration law. The money went to the baseball program, not the players.
  • City Limits: The Long-Term Impact of the LLC Loophole

    A detailed, data-heavy investigation of a controversial feature of New York State's campaign finance landscape that permits corporations to contribute virtually unlimited funds to candidates for state office. Unlike other treatments, this story looks at the full span of the LLC's two-decade impact, the candidates who have benefited most, the entities that have given the highest amounts, their legislative agendas and the impact of the money on state politics.