Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

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  • Unsettling

    The federal government oversees a complex program to help refugees come to this country. But the effort does not always live up to promises, potentially making the path more difficult for refugees striving to adapt to their new homeland. Audits, financial filings and internal government reports indicate that a significant number of government-funded charities contracted to help the newcomers are misspending money, an NYCity News Service examination of hundreds of documents found. Promised services are delayed or never delivered, medical care is often postponed beyond guidelines and program oversight can lag. http://unsettling.nycitynewsservice.com/
  • Rental Inspections

    Student rental housing being the chief industry of our small college town of Frostburg, Md., student reporter Brad Kroner worked for months to obtain city inspection data of rental units. The information finally provided showed 75 percent of rental units had not been inspected in the past three years, as required by municipal code, including many units owned by the mayor. Embarrassed by the published story that resulted, City Hall quickly released an updated set of data – which still showed the city was far from compliant – and said the first set was incomplete because its beleaguered staff had to compile the data from scratch. In other words, the city did not even have the data to know whether it was compliant, until an undergraduate filed a Maryland Public Information Act request asking for it.
  • Transparency

    A four-month KHOU investigation reveals how Houston’s $8 million police body camera program is falling short of its promises. Police and politicos touted it as the blueprint for transparency and accountability, but six months into the program, KHOU discovered that “transparency” has become more of a city hall buzzword than benchmark for the truth. The Houston Police Department violates its own policies. The public can’t readily access video footage. And officers don’t always press the record button when it counts. https://youtu.be/7qbf_rgt__s http://www.khou.com/local/investigative/bodycamtransparency
  • Voiceless

    "Voiceless" exposes a flawed system in which access to interpretation and translation services can spell the difference between life and death for Spanish-speaking victims of domestic violence in New York City.
  • Undisclosed police misconduct in Springfield, Mass.

    These stories document a series of misconduct allegations against Springfield, Mass. police officers which remained undisclosed by authorities until uncovered by reporters with MassLive/The Republican. Drawing on public records requests, interviews with alleged victims and tips from confidential sources, the series centers on three incidents: the death of a prisoner in Springfield Police headquarters, the suspension of a detective who threatened to kill a juvenile suspect and an investigation into allegations that off-duty officers beat a group of men after an argument at a bar. The series has led to changes in how the city reports police misconduct allegations, an effort by city councilors to reinstate a civilian police commission and an external review of the department’s internal investigations unit.
  • Failing at Fire Drills

    This yearlong investigation into school fire preparedness revealed repeated failures by school, city and state officials charged with the safety of Philadelphia’s and Pennsylvania’s school children.
  • Maine Power Grab

    A Bangor Daily News investigation found that hundreds of thousands of Maine customers of competitive electricity providers have paid $50 million more than they needed to for power since 2012.
  • Bonds & Fees

    Amarillo had a November election that included seven bond issues. The city council also decided to increase water fees over a five-year period. This story explores the total cost to tax payers if all the bonds pass and all the water fees go into effect.
  • Amarillo Economic Development Corporation Travel Expenses

    This series looks at travel expenses from the Amarillo Economic Development Corporation (AEDC) during a three-year period. The AEDC is mostly funded with taxpayer money with the Amarillo city council approving the almost $2 million operating budget. The findings include luxury hotel expenses, purchases of alcohol, meals at high-end restaurants, late check-out fees and rounds of golf. Some receipts were hand-written, unreadable or not itemized. There is little to no oversight of these expenses either by the organization or the city. The AEDC has no “written” policies on travel and the president approves his own expenses. Many of the meals, trips and rounds of golf are considered an investment, but there is no record of who attended because the AEDC says the deals are confidential. The organization has existed for 26 years but has brought in 34 businesses during that time to Amarillo.
  • Free Water

    It seems like a simple process: you use a service, you pay for the service. But not when you are dealing with the city of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management. Most of this entry focuses on a single fancy condominium's startling water and sewer non-payment history and Atlanta's reaction. But the floodgates opened as the reporters continued digging. After finally receiving records the city didn't want them to see, the reporters found even more shocking multi-million dollar billing mistakes on thousands of other properties.