Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "civil rights" ...

  • The CBS Evening News with Norah O’Donnell: Chicago Wrong Raids

    The CBS Evening News and the WBBM investigative team revealed an alarming pattern of Chicago Police officers raiding the wrong homes, traumatizing innocent families and children, and, in the process, violating citizens’ Fourth Amendment rights. None of the officers involved had been disciplined or held accountable by the department.
  • The Texas Observer with The Investigative Fund: The Surge

    If Texas’s border counties have some of the lowest crime rates in the nation, why are they so heavily policed? As Melissa del Bosque shows, the State of Texas has gone all in on border security spending, devoting $2.6 billion to special-ops teams, armored gunboats, high-tech spy planes, and a surge of law enforcement personnel in the past several years — on top of a multibillion-dollar federal border security operation. For her piece for The Texas Observer, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, del Bosque interviewed residents and elected officials in these border counties, now among the most profiled and surveilled communities in America, who described how this two-fisted border security buildup has taken a toll on their civil liberties. In a separate analysis, Del Bosque joins with reporter G.W. Schulz to uncover how Texas's $15 million high-altitude spy planes have surveilled one border town at least 357 times and may have traveled multiple times into Mexican territory.
  • Texas Tribune: Blocked Out

    The Texas Tribune revealed how powerful people, from state lawmakers and city officials to politically active neighborhood leaders, have made housing of all kinds harder to find, especially subsidized housing for the state’s poorest residents. And it exposed how those powerful people are enabled by discriminatory state laws and local ordinances that grew from pre-civil rights segregation policies. The result is worsening economic inequality and racial segregation in a growing state that isn't making room fast enough for its exploding population.
  • Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote

    “Silenced: 1.5 Million Florida Felons Without a Vote” is a television news special that raised awareness about the large amount of the state’s population that is ineligible to vote due to a prior felony conviction. The news special outlined the subjectivity in current way in which Florida restores felon’s voting rights, highlighted a proposed state amendment that would automatically restore voting rights to most Florida felons, and featured prospective voters discussing the issue after watching the special as a group.
  • ProPublica: Civil Wrongs

    Nowhere has the Trump administration's pullback on civil rights been more pronounced or damaging than in education. Under Secretary Betsy DeVos, the Education Department has deep-sixed thousands of civil rights complaints — especially those alleging systemic discrimination by school districts and colleges. In their series, "Civil Wrongs," reporters Annie Waldman of ProPublica and Erica L. Green of The New York Times exposed the department's indifference, and the toll on African-American, Latino, and Native American students from Virginia to Montana. Their work has already had significant impact, and is likely to be even more influential in 2019 as Democrats who now control the U.S. House of Representatives tackle DeVos’ civil rights record. Alongside their reporting, the team, which included news app developers Lena Groeger and David Eads, created two interactive databases: one allowing readers to look up civil rights investigations into their school districts and colleges and another illustrating racial disparities in educational opportunities and discipline.
  • BETRAYED: Chicago schools fail to protect students from sexual abuse and assault, leaving lasting damage

    In “Betrayed,” Tribune reporters for the first time quantified the staggering prevalence of sexual violence against students in a large U.S. school district. Using confidential records, innovative data analysis and sensitive interviews with young people, the team discovered and verified 523 times when police investigated a case of sexual assault or abuse of a child inside a Chicago public school in the last decade. Reporters told the wrenching stories of young victims and uncovered child-protection failures that extended from neighborhood schools to the district's downtown offices and the state capital. For years, media outlets attempted to measure the problem of sexual violence against students by examining the cases of disciplined educators or those convicted of crimes. But those efforts failed to account for cases where students are abused by peers or the adult abuser was not punished. By pursuing crimes against students that were documented in police records, the Tribune shed light on a hidden injustice. The reporting proved to be a catalyst for change, leading to massive reforms by district officials, 12 state reform bills and enforcement efforts by the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights.
  • Edward Snowden's Guardian Angels

    On June 9, 2013, when Edward Snowden chose Hong Kong as the place where to reveal the massive civil rights abuses by the American intelligence services, he forgot one thing: where to go next. Still, he managed to escape the American agents, the Hong Kong Police and all journalists who were chasing him. This article reveals for the first time how Snowden managed to stay hidden in Hong Kong for two weeks before leaving for Moscow. And it introduces the people who helped him.
  • Who Guards the Guardians

    This series was developed to give the public an insider's view into a taxpayer funded court system that can do irreparable harm after it is asked to help. It is the section of the court that deals with families bickering over what do to with an aging, ailing Mom or Dad. Judges in these courts have extraordinary powers to strip the elderly of their civil rights, push family members aside and appoint strangers to act as personal and financial guardians for the newly proclaimed “ward of the court.” In the process the guardians can – and do – ignore carefully prepared estate plans and wills, bypassing the expressed wishes of the elder. It is a growing nationwide problem which will only become more pervasive as the U.S. population continues to grow older. This series focuses on the especially secretive system in place in New Mexico.
  • Assault On Justice

    When you hear the charge “assaulting a police officer,” you might assume that an officer has been hurt or injured while serving the community. But in D.C., you might not be able to take so-called APOs at face value. WAMU 88.5 investigative reporter Patrick Madden, along with journalist Christina Davidson, teamed with the Center For Investigative Reporting's Reveal program and American University's Investigative Reporting Workshop to document and analyze nearly 2,000 cases with charges of assaulting a police officer. The results raise concerns about the use or overuse of the charge. Some defense attorneys see troubling indicators in the numbers, alleging that the law is being used as a tactic to cover up police abuse and civil rights violations. The statute “goes too far and criminalizes too much,” one expert says. http://wamu.org/projects/assault-on-justice/
  • Black Out in the Black Belt

    The eyes of the world again turned to some Alabama's most neglected residents when Gov. Bentley announced in September the closures of driver's license offices. Our staff jumped into immediate action in uncovering the pattern of race and poverty in these actions, sounding an alarm picked up around the civilized world. "It's not just a civil rights violation," wrote investigative columnist John Archibald. "It is not just a public relations nightmare. It is not just an invitation for worldwide scorn and an alarm bell to the Justice Department. It is an affront to the very notion of justice in a nation where one man one vote is as precious as oxygen."