Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "civil war" ...

  • "The Costs of the Confederacy" / "Monumental Lies"

    Reporters Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler, along with a team of Type Investigations researchers, spent more than a year investigating public funding for sites—monuments, statues, parks, libraries, museums—and Confederate “heritage” organizations that promote an inaccurate “Lost Cause” version of American history. According to scholars, that ideology distorts the nation’s collective past by venerating Confederate leaders and the common Confederate soldier; framing of the Civil War as a struggle for Southern states’ rights against “northern aggression”; denying Southern culpability and slavery itself for any role in precipitating the war; and presenting chattel slavery as a humane, Christianizing institution. This is more than mere Confederate myth-making, it is a century-and-half old strategy that was historically deployed to terrorize and disenfranchise African American citizens and to reinstall white supremacy across the South in the wake of Reconstruction. The historic sites that perpetuate these myths have been central to racial violence in recent years, from the Dylann Roof shooting at the AME Zion Church — he had visited Confederate sites before his attack — to the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, centered around the defense of a Confederate monument.
  • Smithsonian Magazine and Reveal, in partnership with The Investigative Fund: The Costs of the Confederacy

    Defenders of Confederate memorials often speak of them as history to be preserved. But a project from Smithsonian Magazine and Reveal, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, found that many of these monuments, created by Jim Crow governments, receive substantial taxpayer support in the present. Lead reporters Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler found at least $40 million in public monies over the past decade directed to Confederate sites and organizations that embrace white-supremacist ideologies and suppress or whitewash slavery.
  • 60 Minutes: War Crime

    60 MINUTES has obtained rare video of a 2017 sarin gas attack on Syrian civilians that drew a 59-missile response by the U.S. military last year. The disturbing high definition video, shown publically for the first time, exposes the horrors of these internationally banned weapons, that the Syrian Dictator Bashar al-Assad continues to use to massacre his own people.
  • Spygate to Deflategate: Inside what split the NFL and Patriots apart

    For much of the 2015 off-season, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell engaged in public combat with the New England Patriots and quarterback Tom Brady. While the conflict provided great spectacle, the civil war -- known as Deflategate -- pitted Goodell against the Patriots and their star quarterback made no sense. Why were the league's premier franchise, led by a cherished team owner, and Brady, one of the NFL's greatest ambassadors, being smeared because a little air might have been let out of some footballs? But league insiders knew that Deflategate didn't begin on the eve of the AFC Championship Game. It began in 2007, with another scandal, this one called Spygate.
  • War and Hunger

    Scott Pelley reports from the borders of Jordan, where the United Nations, led by its World Food Programme, has undertaken the huge task of feeding and caring for millions of refugees from Syria's civil war.
  • Firestone and the Warlord

    "Firestone and the Warlord" investigates the secret relationship between the American tire company Firestone and the infamous Liberian warlord Charles Taylor. The multiplatform investigation is a revelatory window into how Firestone conducted business during the brutal Liberian civil war, drawing on previously unreported diplomatic cables, court documents, and inside accounts from Americans who helped run the company's rubber plantation as Liberia descended into chaos. The Liberian civil war resulted in the deaths of more than 200,000 people. Half the country’s population was displaced. Taylor later became the first person convicted of crimes against humanity since the Nazi era. Through most of the conflict, Firestone continued to export rubber to the United States and elsewhere to produce tires, condoms and medical supplies.
  • The Jihad Next Door: The Syrian Roots of Iraq’s Newest Civil War

    This is the first story to investigate and map out in detail how Al-Qaeda established a foothold in Syria after the start of the Syrian uprising in March 2011. It explains how the group now known as Islamic State used the Syrian conflict like an incubator, to rejuvenate, recruit and draw human and material resources to its base in Iraq via Syria. The story explains how the under-equipped, poorly organized moderate rebels lost ground to the increasingly influential Jabhat al-Nusra; how the West watched as a new, reformed and ultimately more dangerous version of Al-Qaeda quickly rose in Syria and reduced the space for others to operate in. Among its major findings, the piece lays bare how the Syrian government's release of jailed Islamists from its notorious Sednaya prison early in the revolution provided a ready-made network for Al-Qaeda to exploit.
  • Al Qaeda Reborn: On Europe's Doorstep

    A revolution that began with shots fired at peaceful protesters more than a thousand days ago is now a bloody civil war with no resolution in sight. But for many Syrians in battered rebel-held areas, a new, unimaginable, cruel dystopia has swallowed them. Infiltrating slowly at first, but now controlling many rebel held areas are the men of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Many of them foreigners, they make up a hardline, radical, brutal al Qaeda linked group seeking a Taliban-esque society. It is Islamic law and al Qaeda's most radical followers are now visible from Turkey, a key part of NATO. In almost six months, the group has risen to take control of much of northern Syria, killing those who oppose them. Its power is only increasing. This is the new threat emerging inside Syria.
  • Law and Disorder

    "Law and Disorder" is a two-part series on misconduct in the Edison Police Department. Day 1, "Law and Disorder," showed how taxpayers and civilians suffered the consequences of a bitter civil war within the department, responsible for public safety in New Jersey's fifth-largest community. Day 2, "Betraying the Badge," focused on the astonishing record of misconduct in the police department.
  • Mauritania: Slavery's Last Stronghold

    Two CNN Digital reporters traveled to Mauritania -- a West African nation that became the last country in the world to abolish slavery – to document a practice the Mauritanian government denies still exists. Spending nearly a year to gain entry into the country and conducting many of their interviews at night and in covert locations, John Sutter and Edythe McNamee went to great lengths to uncover the tragedy of multigenerational servitude in Mauritania. They met people who’ve never known freedom; people who escaped slavery to find their lives hadn't changed; and abolitionists who have been fighting against slavery for years with minimal results. It was only five years ago -- in 2007 -- that the country finally passed a law that making slavery a crime. So far, only one slave owner has been convicted. The United Nations estimates 10% to 20% of Mauritanians live in slavery today. But the country continues to deny slavery’s existence and attempted to subvert Sutter’s and McNamee’s reporting by assigning to them a government “minder.” Nonetheless, the two succeeded at putting a face on a shocking practice that is similar to slavery in America before the Civil War, in which people are born into slavery and rarely escape. Their report – “Slavery’s Last Stronghold” -- featured a variety of mediums, including personal video accounts and written stories featuring firsthand accounts from freed slaves and one man’s transformative journey from slave owner to abolitionist. It also included related stories – such as the story of escaped Mauritanian slaves now living in Ohio. In response to the initiative, CNN iReport, the network’s global participatory news community, gathered messages of hope and support to be shared at a school for escaped slaves in Nouakchott, Mauritania.