Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "clergy" ...

  • Charity Caught on Camera

    As an Indiana charity collected $7 million in donations, this undercover WTHR investigation exposed stunning mismanagement that violated public trust. Months of surveillance and undercover video revealed (literally) tons of food and donations intended for the homeless shelter never made it to the homeless at all. Instead, much of the food went directly to the charity’s leaders – some of the most respected and powerful clergy in the community – who took the food for themselves, their friends, their family members, and even for their pets. The managerial abuses, neglect and dangerous living conditions uncovered by WTHR’s 13 Investigates team prompted immediate resignations, ongoing local and state investigations, and significant changes to protect the charity’s homeless residents and its donors. http://www.wthr.com/tags/grant-county-rescue-mission-13-investigates
  • Fugitive Fathers

    The Catholic Church has allowed priests accused of sexually abusing children in the United States and Europe to relocate to poor parishes in South America, a year-long GlobalPost investigation has found. GlobalPost Senior Correspondent Will Carless and videographer Jimmy Chalk confronted five accused priests. One who relocated to a poor parish in Peru admitted on camera to molesting a 13-year-old boy while working in the Jackson, Mississippi diocese. Another is currently under investigation in Brazil after allegations arose that he abused disadvantaged children living in an orphanage he founded there. All five were able to continue working as priests, despite criminal investigations or cash payouts to alleged victims. All enjoyed the privilege, respect and unfettered access to young people that comes with being clergy members. http://www.globalpost.com/article/6677019/2015/10/28/priest-almost-got-away http://www.globalpost.com/article/6655538/2015/09/23/could-vatican-face-racketeering-charges-harboring-abusive-clergy http://www.globalpost.com/article/6649057/2015/09/14/fugitive-fathers http://www.globalpost.com/article/6669574/2015/10/15/fugitive-fathers-two-priests-have-been-suspended-globalposts http://www.globalpost.com/article/6653949/2015/09/21/survivor-advocates-critique-pope-francis-lack-real-progress-priest-sex http://www.globalpost.com/article/6649016/2015/09/14/us-priests-accused-child-sex-abuse-find-refuge-south-american-churches http://www.globalpost.com/article/6663599/2015/10/06/explainer-how-abusive-priests-are-able-relocate-abroad http://www.globalpost.com/article/6650841/2015/09/16/us-priests-accused-sex-abusive-get-second-chance-relocating-south-america
  • Letter Confirms St. John's Abbey Knew About Clergy Two Years Before Releasing Names to Public

    St. John’s Abbey in Collegeville, Minn., released a list of 18 monks who sexually abused children on December 9, 2013. The St. John’s Abbey said the list was unveiled to achieve transparency. Through a letter obtained by UTVS News, we revealed that the St. John's Abbey knew about credible allegations of sexual abuse by Father Dominic Keller in July 2011, more than two years before Keller's name was made public by the St. John's Abbey on Dec. 9, 2013. Moreover, we found only 3 of the 18 names were new to the public. This story, done on a 48-hour deadline by UTVS News Reporter Nick Minock at St. Cloud State University, gives a voice to victims and informs viewers that at least two monks, who are credibly accused of sexually abusing minors at St. John's Abbey, still work in Minnesota parishes.
  • Betrayed by Silence

    Through the fall and winter of 2013, MPR News delivered a powerful collection of investigative radio stories that exposed how leaders of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis were continuing to cover-up the sexual abuse of children by priests. We found the archdiocese had hidden the names of abusive priests for decades, provided secret payments to pedophiles, and failed to report possible child pornography on a priest’s computer to police or warn parishioners of another priest’s sexual addiction. We exposed how two priests had secretly confessed to sexually abusing children decades ago –one was teaching sex education to troubled teenagers and the other was living half a block from a school. Our investigation peeled back the layers of false promises by leaders who had guided the national response to the clergy abuse scandal a decade earlier – and showed that children remained at risk.
  • Sacred Monsters

    This story delves into the history of clergy sex abuse at St. Anthony’s Seminary in Santa Barbara, revealing the disturbing history of the city as not only a place where abuse ran rampant, but to where Catholic Church officials would stash problem priests. Along the way, we get a better sense of the mindset of Cardinal Roger Mahony and his right-hand man, Bishop Thomas Curry of Santa Barbara, as they concern themselves more with damage control and cover-up than restitution. The presentation includes three compelling videos, including a gripping interview with Ferricano, a St. Anthony’s Seminary survivor, as well as interviews with A. W. Richard Sipe, an expert on the church, sex and celibacy; and with Terence McKiernan, president of BishopAccountability.com, which aggregates documents and articles related to the worldwide Catholic clergy sex abuse scandal. We also published an interactive timeline in which readers could see important dates in this history of abuse in Santa Barbara. The timeline includes links to documents, photos and other materials that help tell the story.
  • Betrayed by Silence

    Through the fall and winter of 2013, MPR News delivered a powerful collection of investigative radio stories that exposed how leaders of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis were continuing to cover-up the sexual abuse of children by priests. We found the archdiocese had hidden the names of abusive priests for decades, provided secret payments to pedophiles, and failed to report possible child pornography on a priest’s computer to police or warn parishioners of another priest’s sexual addiction. We exposed how two priests had secretly confessed to sexually abusing children decades ago –one was teaching sex education to troubled teenagers and the other was living half a block from a school. Our investigation peeled back the layers of false promises by leaders who had guided the national response to the clergy abuse scandal a decade earlier – and showed that children remained at risk.
  • An Irish Tragedy

    "This is the story of how Irish immigrant clergy, who had helped to build the American Catholic church in years past, undermined that church by their widespread sexual abuse of children. It is a sad tale that had gone untold, until now."
  • Altar Ego

    This investigation examines a murder that occurred 45 years ago, committed by a priest. At the story's heart is a study of the profound difference between the Roman Catholic Church's view, especially the church of 1960, and that of the American judicial system, regarding the nature of justice.
  • Zipped Up!

    This story is part of Russell's ongoing investigation into how the Roman Catholic hierarchy covers up sex-abuse by priests. Specifically, this story focuses on how former San Francisco Archbishop William J. Levada co-opted district attorneys in three California counties to help keep decades of alleged sexual misconduct by priests secret.
  • The Price of Prosperity

    Lavigne found that Collin County, a suburb of Dallas, had one of the highest median income rates in the nation, and also one of the lowest median net worth rates among wealthy counties. Upon looking deeper, she found that bankruptcies had doubled in a five-year period, and there had been 3,300 foreclosures on homes, most of them in high income neighborhoods. She interviewed dozens of families, clergy, business people, finance experts and other residents of Collin county for her series, as well as accessing federal, state and local data. She found that many people were living beyond their means to keep up with their neighbors.