Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "coach" ...

  • School Violence

    A young woman sexually assaulted, a grade-nine student “jumped” from behind, kicked in the head and left unconscious, another beaten in the hallway while students watched and recorded on their phones, Indigenous elementary students chased and in fear, a black student repeatedly attacked, called names and physically assaulted. All of these students bravely came forward, seeking help from those who are supposed to protect them - their teachers, principals and coaches. School should feel safe but for these students and thousands of others, school didn't feel safe anymore. Gaining the trust of these young people and telling their stories in a meaningful, empowering way became our goal. CBC’s months-long investigation also took a data-driven approach to document what many called a rise of violence in Canada’s schools. We gave a voice to more than 4,000 students through a groundbreaking survey while documenting a shocking lack of reporting, countrywide.
  • Orange County Register/Southern California News Group: Olympic sports sex abuse

    This Is the Orange County Register’s investigation into decades of sexual abuse within American Olympic sports, the culture that enabled that abuse and the lengths top officials and coaches have taken to cover up that abuse leaving unsuspecting young athletes still vulnerable to predatory coaches and officials.
  • KyCIR: A Louisville Family Reported Sexual Abuse By A Coach. He Worked With Kids For 15 More Years

    When he was 17 years old, Eric Flynn confided to his parents that his coach, Drew Conliffe, had sexually abused him dozens of times over a period of at least two years. Conliffe and his father, a former elected county attorney, paid the family for years for their silence. He apparently escaped serious consequences, despite two police investigations, even though dozens of people and several Louisville institutions knew about the allegation. In the wake of our investigation, several more alleged victims came forward.
  • Daily Iowegian: Indian Hills Community College

    The Indian Hills Community College baseball team in Iowa ousted two of its coaches — one of them a hall of fame coach — in May. After a more than four-month investigation, the Daily Iowegian found the coaches were removed after an internal investigation that coaches forced players to work for security companies at NFL and Big 10 games in Minneapolis and Iowa City, all while assigning fake names to foreign-born students so they could work around federal immigration law. The money went to the baseball program, not the players.
  • Baltimore Sun: University of Maryland football scandal

    University of Maryland offensive lineman Jordan McNair died of heatstroke in June, weeks after he collapsed during football practice. His death sent shockwaves through the university community, eventually causing the president to be forced out, the football coach to be fired and the board of regents chairman to resign. We strove to investigate the circumstances of the student's death and how the university handled the subsequent fallout.
  • California Prosecution Fees

    The Desert Sun uncovered how residents of three cities in the Coachella Valley were being billed massive fees that paid for private attorneys the city had contracted to go after the residents' for minor city code violations. Petty offenses, like having a messy yard or hanging a Halloween decoration on a street light, led to thousands or tens of thousands of dollars being demanded of the residents. If they couldn't pay, liens were assessed. Following the reporting, the cities stopped the practice, state lawmakers made it illegal in California and a class-action lawsuit led to at least one city refunding the residents.
  • Indian Hills Community College

    The Indian Hills Community College baseball team in Iowa ousted two of its coaches — one of them a hall of fame coach — in May. After a more than four-month investigation, the Daily Iowegian found the coaches were removed after an internal investigation that coaches forced players to work for security companies at NFL and Big 10 games in Minneapolis and Iowa City, all while assigning fake names to foreign-born students so they could work around federal immigration law. The money went to the baseball program, not the players.
  • Out of Balance

    A nine-month investigation by The Indianapolis Star found 368 gymnasts had alleged sexual abuse over the last two decades at the hands of coaches and other authority figures — and revealed why: USA Gymnastics, the sport’s national governing body, failed to protect young athletes by employing a policy of dismissing many child sex abuse allegations as hearsay; declining to report allegations to police; failing to track abusive coaches who move from gym to gym; denying responsibility for oversight; and, in some cases, pressuring alleged victims to remain silent. The reporting also emboldened more than 60 women to come forward with allegations of sexual abuse against a longtime USA Gymnastics team physician, who now faces state and federal charges.
  • The Dennis Hastert Scandal

    When U.S. prosecutors indicted Dennis Hastert last spring for violating obscure financial regulations connected to payments of more than a million dollars to an unnamed individual, this exclusive Brian Ross investigation exposed the true story behind the charges. Recalling a tip from 10 years earlier that came by fax during their reporting of the Mark Foley congressional page scandal, ABC News Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and Chief Investigative Producer Rhonda Schwartz located and convinced a key source to finally go public. In an exclusive interview, Jolene Burdge revealed that her now-deceased brother had been molested in his teens by Hastert, his high school wrestling coach and that there were likely other victims. While her brother never received money from Hastert, Burdge’s story helped to explain the mystery of why Hastert had been caught trying to cover up more than a million dollars of payments in hush money. http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/exclusive-woman-hastert-abused-brother-high-school-31581732 http://video-cdn.abcnews.com/160114_ire_broadcast_video_large_hastert.mp4
  • Objective Troy: A Terrorist, A President, and the Rise of the Drone

    Objective Troy tells the story of the life and death of Anwar al-Awlaki, the American imam who denounced 9/11 and called for bridge-building between Muslims and the United States, only to leave the U.S., grow steadily more militant and join Al Qaeda in Yemen. He became the most effective recruiter for Al Qaeda in English; actively plotted to kill Americans, including by coaching the underwear bomber who tried to blow up an airliner over Detroit in 2009; and finally became the first American citizen to be deliberately killed in a drone strike, on orders of President Obama in 2011. The book’s title comes from Awlaki’s code name on the government’s kill list: during a frantic 20-month manhunt that engaged all of the intelligence agencies, Awlaki was Objective Troy. Reported all over the United States and in Yemen, Objective Troy is the most detailed and best-documented account of the life of a central figure in the post-9/11 history of terrorism. Among the revelations in the book are: the first account of Awlaki’s embrace of fundamentalist Islam, while a freshman at Colorado State; the real reason that Awlaki left the United States, abandoning a promising career as a mainstream spokesman for American Muslims; an intelligence mistake in the hunt for Awlaki that led to the disastrous unintentional killing by drone of a popular Yemeni deputy governor; and Awlaki’s afterlife on the Internet, including more than 40,000 YouTube videos, now with the added authority of what his admirers see as martyrdom. The book gives the fullest account to date of President Obama’s embrace of the armed drone as a weapon against terrorism and how its performance has fallen short of the government’s claims.