Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "conflict" ...

  • Kill Anything That Moves

    Americans have long been taught that events such as the notorious My Lai massacre were isolated incidents in the Vietnam War, carried out by "a few bad apples." But as award‑winning journalist and historian Nick Turse demonstrates in this groundbreaking investigation, violence against Vietnamese noncombatants was not at all exceptional during the conflict. Rather, it was pervasive and systematic, the predictable consequence of orders to "kill anything that moves." Drawing on more than a decade of research in secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, Turse reveals for the first time how official policies resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded. In shocking detail, he lays out the workings of a military machine that made crimes in almost every major American combat unit all but inevitable. "Kill Anything That Moves" takes us from archives filled with Washington's long-suppressed war crime investigations to the rural Vietnamese hamlets that bore the brunt of the war; from boot camps where young American soldiers learned to hate all Vietnamese to bloodthirsty campaigns like Operation Speedy Express, in which a general obsessed with body counts led soldiers to commit what one participant called "a My Lai a month." Thousands of Vietnam books later, "Kill Anything That Moves," devastating and definitive, finally brings us face‑to‑face with the truth of a war that haunts Americans to this day.
  • Spotlight on the Texas Legislature

    During the 2013 legislative session, The Texas Tribune rolled out two entirely innovative ways to watchdog the state’s elected officials – the first-ever gavel-to-gavel livestream of Texas House and Senate proceedings, and the Ethics Explorer, an interactive investigative app documenting the conflicts of interest and financial relationships of every member of the Legislature. Combined, these two tools gave the Texas public unfettered access to the political maneuvering and shenanigans under the Pink Dome, including an unprecedented abortion filibuster that thrust our scrappy news organization into the national spotlight. No other Texas news organization came close to providing this service; they and many national news sites all relied on the Tribune. Check out the Tribune's interactive, livestream and video links below: http://www.texastribune.org/bidness/explore/ http://www.texastribune.org/session/83R/live/ http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2013/06/25/watch-wendy-davis-filibuster-of-texas-abortion-law-video/
  • Going Postal – U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein's husband sells post offices to his friends, cheap

    CBRE Group. Inc. is a commercial real estate corporation which is chaired by Richard C. Blum, who is the husband of U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein of California. In 2011, the United States Postal Service (USPS) awarded CBRE an exclusive contract to sell off postal real estate in cities and towns across America. Based upon examining hundreds of public records, Going Postal reported that CBRE has sold more than $200 million worth of post office real estate at under fair market values, often to the firm's clients and business partners. CBRE's contract with the USPS requires the company to obtain fair market prices for properties that it brokers on behalf of the public and to avoid such conflicts of interest.
  • 2001 Oak Ridge Nuclear Cavitation Confirmation Uncovered

    "2001 Oak Ridge Nuclear Cavitation Confirmation Uncovered" is a 12-part investigative series that appeared in the summer of 2013 in New Energy Times. The series is about the 2001-02 conflict surrounding experiments performed in the nuclear weapons facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The key events took place a decade ago, and the most crucial facts of this conflict had never been published. These facts reverse the commonly understood outcome of this scientific finding and correct the historical record. This investigation also reveals the dark side of science, how scientists can and do neglect their social responsibility, abuse their power, and behave unscientifically. It reveals the devastating price paid by other scientists who assume that scientific facts can speak for themselves, and how they fail to understand the tremendous impact of science media on public opinion.
  • Spotlight on the Texas Legislature

    During the 2013 legislative session, The Texas Tribune rolled out two entirely innovative ways to watchdog the state’s elected officials – the first-ever gavel-to-gavel livestream of Texas House and Senate proceedings, and the Ethics Explorer, an interactive investigative app documenting the conflicts of interest and financial relationships of every member of the Legislature. Combined, these two tools gave the Texas public unfettered access to the political maneuvering and shenanigans under the Pink Dome, including an unprecedented abortion filibuster that thrust our scrappy news organization into the national spotlight. No other Texas news organization came close to providing this service; they and many national news sites all relied on the Tribune.
  • Bidness as Usual

    The Texas Tribune spent more than a year documenting the conflicts and interests of the state's elected officials, who have gone to great lengths to avoid making any improvements to Texas' ethics and reporting rules, which date back four decades. In addition to producing more than 50 stories, the Tribune rolled out a comprehensive and well-researched data interactive that outlines the personal interests and relationships of every elected official in Texas, in addition to putting all of their financial records online for the very first time.
  • Living Apart: Fair Housing in America

    The series documents 45 years of neglect of one of the most sweeping civil rights laws in our country’s history. The investigation found that the federal government made a decision almost immediately after the passage of the 1968 Fair Housing Act not to enforce the key provisions of the law, including the mandate to promote residential integration. The stories and maps reveal how politics hobbled the reach of the law, severely limiting both the resources and the will of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to use its vast powers to force communities to undue decades of government-sanctioned segregation. It showed how HUD has from its roots been an agency conflicted about enforcing the law and how those charged with enforcement are undertrained and often maligned within the agency. As a result of the law’s neglect by a succession of Republican and Democratic Administrations, our investigation found that segregation patterns in the cities with the largest proportion of black residents have barely budged.
  • Corruption at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

    From the Summer Olympics to papal visits to Super Bowls, the iconic peristyle of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum long symbolized many of the city’s proudest hours. Now, because of the work of three Los Angeles Times reporters, the stately columns have become an emblem of one of the worst corruption scandals in recent Southern California history. The stories produced by Rong-Gong Lin II, Paul Pringle and Andrew Blankstein have led directly to the felony indictments of three public officials, the nation’s No. 1 promoter of rave concerts, another prominent music executive and a government contractor. A second misdemeanor case has been filed against two other Coliseum employees. The charges spelled out in the indictments mirror the reporters' findings – tales of bribery, embezzlement, kickbacks and conflict of interest. They allege that the taxpayers who own the Coliseum were bilked out of some $2 million and perhaps much more.
  • Deeply Buried Doubts: Errors and Fraud Threaten California’s Costliest Bridge

    This year-long investigation examined construction and testing of the new $6.4 billion San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, and found widespread errors and malfeasance. The new eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge is the most costly public works project in California history. Its designers valued one quality above all others: the strength to withstand the strongest anticipated earthquake. This investigation raised questions about the structural integrity of the span that are not easy to answer. It revealed flaws in tests of the main tower’s foundation, chronicled the troubled work history of the technician who conducted many of the tests and had fabricated data on other structures. The series also revealed bridges throughout the state burdened with similar issues – raising calls for new safety examinations. Until contacted by The Bee, the California Department of Transportation had overlooked the problems with the Bay Bridge. But the findings of the initial stories of the series – validated by top experts in the construction and testing of such massive foundations – forced them to act. Two Caltrans employees – the technician and his supervisor – were fired as a result of the Bee stories, prosecutors launched investigations and state legislative committees convened to examine the department’s practices and culture. The stories were based on a review of about 80,000 pages of technical plans, test results, internal emails and personnel documents, and interviews with numerous insiders. The Bee showed how officials failed to conduct a thorough investigation of testing fabrications, years after learning of the problems. After the initial story in 2011 (not part of this award application, but included in the submission for context only), Caltrans’ “peer review” experts examined the Bay Bridge– and gave it a clean bill of health. Piller showed soon after that they were compromised by serious financial and professional conflicts of interest with Caltrans and bridge contractors.
  • United in Largesse

    United in Largesse is about extravagant spending and lack of accountability in the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers union, which has its headquarters in Kansas City, Kan. The Kansas City Star found that the union president’s salary and expenses far topped those of the presidents of the country’s largest unions and that the union had hired numerous officers’ relatives at robust salaries. The story also showed that union officials traveled by charter or first class to attractive destinations, squandered money on exclusive pheasant-hunting expeditions and Alaskan fly-fishing adventures and gave expensive cars as gifts to retiring officers. The Star also raised serious questions about conflicts of interest involving union pension fund trustees.