Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "constitutional rights" ...

  • To fulfill Trump’s vision on immigration, sheriffs are trampling over constitutional principles

    “To fulfill Trump’s vision on immigration, sheriffs are trampling over constitutional principles,” by Yvette Cabrera and published in ThinkProgress, examines the practice by sheriff’s departments across the country who are holding people in jail past their release date at the request of Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] using a technique that legal experts say raises serious questions about potential constitutional rights violations.
  • L.A. Times: In the Search for Drugs, a Lopsided Dragnet

    Since 2012, deputies in a specialized narcotics unit of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department have pulled over thousands of cars on a rural stretch of the 5 Freeway, California’s major north-south artery. A Times analysis of the unit’s traffic stops found Latino drivers are stopped and searched far more frequently than other motorists – a disparity that translated into thousands of innocent people being detained by deputies acting on little more than a hunch. In several cases, federal judges ruled deputies violated people’s constitutional rights. In response to The Times’ investigation, the Sheriff’s Department recently suspended the unit’s operations.
  • Watched

    Police forces across the United States are stockpiling massive databases with personal information from millions of Americans who simply crossed paths with officers. A person can end up in one of these databases by doing nothing more than sitting on a public park bench or chatting with an officer on the street. Once there, these records can linger forever and be used by police agencies to track movements, habits, acquaintances and associations – even a person’s marital and job status. What began as a method for linking suspicious behavior to crime had morphed into a practice that threatens to turn local police departments into miniature versions of the NSA. In the process, critics contend, police risk trampling constitutional rights, tarnishing innocent people and further eroding public trust.
  • Courting disorder in the schools

    The Public Interest, in light of the recent school shootings, investigates the legal relationship between the courts and the school systems. Starting in 1969, the Supreme Court has consistently given students more constitutional rights , which critics partially blame for rising misconduct and incivility in the classroom. They say disciplinary actions are not being taken because school officials fear lawsuits, thus, contributing to a sense of "do-as-you-please" attitude for the students.
  • When Jurors Dare Not Speak Their Names

    Legal Times details how it is becoming more common within the court system to keep the identities of jury members secret; the policy protects the jurists but brings up questions of constitutional rights and fair trials, May 9, 1994.